War of the Rebellion: Serial 032 Page 0188 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXXIV.

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enemy were repulsed, and retreated upon Hartville, where the rebels were re-enforced by Porter, Burbridge, and Greene, 3,500 strong, with five pieces of artillery. They had a most obstinate fight, until sunset, when our force fell back toward Lebanon in perfect order. Our losses are heavy, but the enemy's much greater. Captain [G. D.] Bradway, of Company E, Third Missouri Cavalry, is the only officer reported killed. I move toward Hartville at 6 o'clock this morning, with 500 men and two pieces of artillery, although barely able to keep my saddle. The infantry in wagons. Our artillery, under Lieutenant [William] Waldschmidt, did fine execution, while the enemy's was badly served, and did us but little damage. Colonel Merrill, of the Twenty-first Iowa, was wounded. I can give no further particulars of casualties.

FITZ HENRY WARREN,

Brigadier-General.

Major General SAMUEL R. CURTIS,

Saint Louis, Mo.

HEADQUARTERS,

Houston, Mo., January 14, 1863.

The battle at Hartville is developed into a brilliant victory. Lieutenant-Colonel [C. W.] Dunlap, with a portion of the Twenty-first Iowa, held the field two hours after the enemy retreated, and Lieutenant [F.] Dale, of same regiment, with 17 men, bivouacked on the fighting-ground, and received the flags of truce in the morning. [J. C.] Porter is reported dead of his wounds. Colonels Hinkle [?] and [G. W.] Thompson, Major [George R.] Kirtley, Captain [C. M.] Turpin, and 2 lieutenants are killed and Captain [L. J.] Crocker and 2 other captains wounded. We captured 2 surgeons, 1 lieutenant, and 38 privates. Lieutenant-Colonel Dunlap and Lieutenant [J. H.] Alexander, of the Twenty-first Iowa, are wounded, in addition to those already reported. Colonel [S.] Merrill and command are within 10 miles of camp. The whole force will be concentrated to-day.

General Marmaduke sends this message by a citizen prisoner: "Tell General Warren his men fought like tigers" - a generous tribute to as brave soldiers as ever bore muskets.

FITZ HENRY WARREN,

Brigadier-General.

Major General SAMUEL R. CURTIS,

Saint Louis, Mo.

HEADQUARTERS,

Houston, Mo., January 14, 1863.

All information by scouting parties sent out confirms me in the opinion expressed yesterday, that the enemy are in rapid retreat toward Arkansas. The force at Hartville consisted of three brigades, General Marmaduke in command, with from 4,000 to 5,000 men. Their loss in killed, wounded, and prisoners will not fall below 250 or 300, including Brigadier General [Colonel] Emmett MacDonald killed, and Porter badly wounded. The conduct of our officers and men was admirable.

FITZ HENRY WARREN,

Brigadier-General.

Major General SAMUEL R. CURTIS,

Saint Louis, Mo.