War of the Rebellion: Serial 032 Page 0180 MO., ARK., KANS., IND. T., AND DEPT. N. W. Chapter XXXIV.

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zers, which I mounted last night, in addition to two brass 6-pounders at Fort Numbers 1. A lieutenant of artillery and some enlisted men have been put in charge of them. The convalescents in hospitals, employees of quartermaster, commissary, and ordnance, and citizens of all ages are being armed. The militia are coming in, and by 12 o'clock I shall have 2,000 men in arms. The brick buildings are being pierced for musketry, and I shall have the wooden ones, if attacked. Fifty thousand rations have been removed to the forts. The trains from the west arrived in the night, and those coming from the east have been sent back to Lebanon. I shall fight as long as I can, in hopes re-enforcements will reach me in time to save the stores. I give you all my plans, as I have no doubt the enemy is in force, and will attack me.

E. B. BROWN.

[Major General SAMUEL R. CURTIS.]

SPRINGFIELD, MO., January 8, 1863.

GENERAL: Our fight has been confined to skirmishing on the open ground south of the town, and cannonading from one of the forts at long range. I have thought best to await the attack until the last moment, as the demonstration looks like a feint, while the real attack is reserved for another point. The enemy have not shown over 500 infantry, two pieces of artillery, and about 1,000 mounted men. Our men are behaving well.

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General.

Major General SAMUEL R. CURTIS,

Commanding Department of the Missouri.

SPRINGFIELD, MO., January 8, 1863 - 3 p. m.

The enemy are crowding the fighting, but my men are behaving well. Rapid musketry firing in the bush close to the town, on the south. I am holding the strong positions, and as night is closing, the enemy must fight me as I want to, or not to-night. They are fighting for bread.

E. B. BROWN,

Brigadier-General.

Major General SAMUEL R. CURTIS,

Commanding Department of the Missouri.

SPRINGFIELD, MO., January 8, 1863 - 11.50 p. m.

GENERAL: The firing at this post has just ceased. The attack was made at 10.10 this morning. The fight lasted thirteen hours, under the command of General Marmaduke, C. S. Army, with 5,000 picked mounted infantry and two pieces rifled field artillery, drawn by ten horses each.

The expedition was fitted in this manner on the Arkansas River for the special service of the capture of Springfield, with its forts and large depots of stores. They moved with great rapidity, marching the last 50 miles in twenty-four hours, skirmishing with my scouting parties almost the entire distance. He moved right up, and immediately com