War of the Rebellion: Serial 032 Page 0021 Chapter XXIV. GENERAL REPORTS.

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to Madison or Wittsburg, it would facilitate his operations. I am not aware whether this is practicable or not. In any event, I respectfully request you to assist General Davidson as far as in your power in opening communication with you and in obtaining supplies from Helena.

I can send you some wagons if you need them. Please advise me of your movements, and let me know if I can assist you in any way.

General Prentiss, I am informed, has left Helena, and I am unable to learn who is now in command.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 5.] HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, July 15, 1863.

Brigadier-General DAVIDSON,

Cape Girardeau:

The force at Helena has been ordered to move on Price's rear. Your command should move forward as soon as possible to prevent his escape across the river. The plan you suggest in your letter of the 10th is very good; you should take supplies enough to last until can draw from Madison or Helena. How soon can you move?

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 6.] HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI, Saint Louis, July 15, 1863.

Brigadier-General DAVIDSON,

Bloomfield, Mo.:

I have written to Helena about your movement, and asked assistance for you in obtaining supplies at Madison or Wittsburg. if this cannot be done, you will have to draw from Helena. Take care in your movements to cover Pilot Knob and Rolla until Marmaduke is no longer in position to threaten those places. Port Hudson surrendered on the 7th, with 6,000 prisoners.

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Major-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 7.] HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE, Vicksburg, Miss, July 21, 1863.

Major-General SCHOFIELD,

Commanding Department of the Missouri:

GENERAL: I am sending, or will send, as soon as transportation can be provided, one division (about 5,000 effective men) to operate in Price's rear. These are the only troops I have not exhausted and worn down. In addition to these, there will probably be 3,000 more to spare from the garrison of Helena and from West Tennessee.

Johnston has been totally routed from Jackson, and will, no doubt, lose half his army from desertion, and the balance will be so broken down and demoralized that but little danger need be apprehended from them for the next sixty days.

My troops are not yet in from Jackson; no part of them. Should it