War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0967 Chapter XXXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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I suggest these views for your consideration. The war appears to me to be gradually assuming the aspect of a long one, to be settled by exhaustion, and every pressure we can put upon a rebel is so much toward the end.

What a pitiable affair was that of Holly Springs! Over 2,000 men, who had been long enough guarding that depot to have intrenched themselves, surrendering because they had not made the simplest preparations for defense. This of a European post surrendering to an hour's siege, with a garrison of 2,000! So, too, at Galveston, 300 men captured. The city had been long enough in our possession to have had a post which could have purchased at least the liberty of its garrison at the cost of its keys.

Wishing you speedy and full success, I am, very truly, your friend,

M. C. MEIGS,

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY DIVISION,

January 12, 1863.

Major-General PARKE, Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: The report from pickets below states the rebels are very busy constructing rifle-pits and breastworks at different points on the opposite side of the river. The report from above states there is no change in the enemy's position at the fords and crossings. A reconnaissance to Deep Run this morning saw no signs of the enemy on this side. My spy got safely over the river last night. He made two attempts before, and failed each time, owing to the movements of the enemy. Shall hear from him in a day or two.

Very respectfully,

A. PLEASONTON.

Brigadier-General.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE EAST,

Numbers 1.

New York City, January 12, 1863.

The following orders from the Adjutant-General of the Army were received on the 11th instant:

GENERAL ORDERS,

WAR DEPARTMENT, ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Numbers 2.

Washington, January 3, 1863.

The Military Department of the East is hereby created, to consist of the New England States and the State of New York. Headquarters New York City.

Major General John E. Wool, U. S. Army, is assigned to the command of the Department of the East.*

By order of Secretary of War:

E. D. TOWNSEND

Assistant Adjutant-General.

In obedience to the above orders, Major General John E. Wool hereby assumes command of the Department of the East.

The following-named officers of the personal staff of the commanding general are announced, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly: Colonel T. J. Cram, aide-de-camp and topographical engineer; Lieutenant Colonel John B. Frothingham, aide-de-camp and acting assistant inspector-

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*The disintegration of the old Department of the East, begun April 9, 1861, was completed October 26 of that year, by the creation of the Department of New York, assigned to the command of Major General E. D. Morgan. That department was merged by above order in the new Department of the East.

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