War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0952 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD. AND PA. Chapter XXXIII.

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ments especially cavalry. Could not a force be sent from Washington, toward Luray and Port Republic, to cut them off?

MILROY.

Will any movement from the Army of the Potomac be made in the direction of the valley?

ROBT. C. SCHENCK

Major-General

BALTIMORE, MD. January 6, 1863.

(Received 10 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK:

General-in-Chief:

What force has General Cox in the direction of Staunton? Can he not threaten an approach toward the valley, and thus make a diversion for our benefit?

ROBT. C. SCHENCK

Major-General.

HARPER'S FERRY, [W.] VA., January 6, 1863

Colonel WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Baltimore:

Major Russell has just returned from a scout as far as Winchester. Went yesterday by way of Charlestown and Berryville; returned via Bunker Hill and Smithfield; all quiet; neither saw nor heard of any rebels in his route. He brings me the same report contained in you dispatch, but says it is only rumor. There may be, and probably is, a force in the upper part of the valley, but I do not believe A. P. Hill is there. If you deem it best, I would suggest that the regiment and battery you have at Baltimore be sent to Milroy. Please give me orders in regard to holding or abandoning Winchester, in case we are threatened with a strong force.

B. F. KELLEY.

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cincinnati, Ohio, January 6, 1863-2.10 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

General Cox telegraphs that there are indications of activity on the part of the enemy east of Beverly, and that General Kelley (to whom he had telegraphed) says the enemy has come down the South Branch of the valley in quite large force, and assailed Colonel Washburn at Moorefield, on Saturday night, with 2,500 men, and that the position is much exposed, and should be re-enforced. There is doubt whether General Cox has any control over Kelley's or Milroy's commands, as there have been, it is understood, certain orders from headquarters in relation to them not received here. There are but four regiments in Northwestern Virginia; two on railroad west of Grafton, and two at Beverly, Buckhannon, and Belington [Bulltown?]. Have instructed General Cox to send two regiments there from Kanawha.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.