War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0951 Chapter XXXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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here to Staunton to make a start. He was reported some days' since by General Dix's spies as having gone south. If he is there, his force, combined with that of General Loring, can scarcely exceed 15,000 men, and I take it that the forces of Generals Milroy, Kelley, and Kenly will be able to check any serious movement they may attempt. Should you find it necessary, you can order General Slocum to that region, and I will replace him by the Eleventh Corps. If they are moving up the valley they are too far off for any general movement of this army to have any effect upon them before they will have encountered our forces there.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTH ARMY CORPS,

Baltimore, January 6, 1863. (Received 10.20 a.m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK:

General-in-Chief, Washington, D. C.:

The following dispatch was received last night:

Lieutenant-Colonel WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Colonel Mulligan reports from Moorefield that nothing has transpired to-day of importance. The rebel cavalry captured a small supply train near Moorefield that nothing has transpired to-day of importance. The rebel cavalry captured a small supply train near Moorefield, killing 1 of the guards. Our cavalry recaptured it shortly afterward.

B. F. KELLEY.

Brigadier-General.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK

Major-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE, MD. January 6, 1863.

(Received 12.45 p.m.)

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The following dispatch from Colonel Mulligan to General Kelley has just been received:

MOOREFIELD, [W.] VA., January 6, 1863

General KELLEY:

With the battery and 1,300 cavalry and infantry, I moved against the camp of the enemy at daybreak. He fled a few hours before, His strength was 3,000. No enemy threatens Moorefield. What are your future intentions?

JAS. A. MULLIGAN,

Colonel.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, MD. January 6, 1863

(Received 8.30 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

The following telegram from Milroy's division, Winchester, has just been received:

Information is received that Hill and Loring are approaching this place, by way of Staunton and New Market, in heavy force. I can hold this place, but need re-enforce-