War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0921 Chapter XXXIII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. - UNION.

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BALTIMORE, MD. December 30, 1862

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

I have ordered the One hundred and fiftieth Regiment New York Infantry and two sections of Chalfin's battery, Fifth U. S. Artillery, up the railroad, in the direction of Monocacy Bridge. I have a regiment of infantry (the Fourteenth New Jersey) and a section of Chalfin's battery stationed at Monocacy Bridge. The rebel cavalry, if they reach the railroad, will probably cross at or near New Market, and pass westward, around by Frederick and Hagerstown. Can you have anything done from the Army of the Potomac to stop their return? I have heard nothing since telegraphing you before.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, MD. December 30, 1862

General KELLEY, Harper's Ferry:

Do not permit the cavalry, reported by Colonel Galligher, to cross the river, if possible to prevent it. It is a body of about 1,000 cavalry and four pieces of artillery,under Fitzhugh Lee. They have made a raid on Dumfries, and are now bent on Leesburg and across the river. Stop them from crossing, if possible. Use your own judgment what measures to take or movement of troops to make, reporting same to these headquarters, however. A later telegram from Colonel Galligher says the rebels intend crossing at Noland's Ferry and at Point of Rocks.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

BALTIMORE, MD. December 30, 1862

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

I have received the following dispatch from General Kelley:

I have already made my arrangements to send all of my disposable cavalry force with a battery, across into Maryland; but I cannot get any reliable information of the crossing of the rebels and, as my cavalry is very much scattered along the line, I am at a loss at what point it will be best to concentrate. Is your information reliable? The road and telegraph lines are yet safe. If he ventures this way; with the expectation of crossing into Virginia, he will certainly get into trouble.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

The troops I have ordered from here to assist General Kelley are about embarking.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, December 30, 18620-9.10 p.m.

Major-General SCHENCK, Baltimore, Md.:

Major-General Heintzelman, in Washington, has the immediate command of all forces on the Potomac from this place to the Monocacy. His advices are that the enemy is passing through Aldie Gap. He has about 800 cavalry on the enemy's trail.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.