War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0900 OPERATIONS IN N.VA.,W.VA.,MD.,AND PA. Chapter XXXIII.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington City, D. C., December 30, 1862-3.30 p.m.

Major-General BURNSIDE:

I have good reason for saying you must not make a general movement of the army without letting me know.

A. LINCOLN.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, December 30, 1862.

The PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES:

Your dispatch is received. I have rescinded some orders that had already been given. I am summoned to give evidence in court-martial to-morrow at Washington, and will see you.

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS CENTER GRAND DIVISION,

Camp near Falmouth, Va., December 30, 1862.

Lieutenant Colonel LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

I have the honor to inform you that the troops left camp to-day, as directed by the major-general commanding the Army of the Potomac, and will be in position to execute their instructions by daylight to-morrow morning. Barnes' division, from the Fifth Corps, and three regiments from the Second Division, Third Corps, were intrusted with this duty.

Very respectfully, &c.,

JOSEPH HOOKER,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS CENTER GRAND DIVISION,

Camp near Falmouth, Va., December 30, 1862.

Colonel JAMES BARNES,

Commanding Division, Fifth Corps:

The major-general commanding is informed that your division has been detailed to co-operate with the forces of Brigadier-General Averell. In the execution of this, the major-general commanding directs that you march with your command at 12 m. to-day in the direction of Hartwood, where you will detach one brigade, with directions to proceed and encamp in the vicinity of Deep Creek, and from thence, the next morning, take a position at Morrisville. A battery will be ordered to report to you, and it is desired that it accompany this brigade. The remaining two brigades should march from Hartwood, in the direction of Richard's Ford, and encamp as near that ford to-night as practicable, without being discovered by the enemy,and at daylight to-morrow morning throw one brigade across the river at Richard's Ford, and direct it to march by the most direct route up the river to Ellis' Ford, about 4 miles, and recross the river at that point. It is reported that the enemy have an infantry picket of two companies and one piece of artillery at Richards' Ford, which you will capture, disperse, or destroy, and also the picket at Ellis' Ford, which you will approach from the rear. The remaining brigade you will leave at Richards' Ford, in readiness to sup-