War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0891 Chapter XXXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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two barges and other vessels. The landings cover a long space, and the water is shallow, and at Belle Plain the bottom is a deep, soft mud. We must have boats armed to break ice that can keep the river open, else this army cannot be supplied in case of very cold weather. So far the army has been well supplied. I make this dispatch for your information.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster.

BALTIMORE, MD., December 27, 1862-1 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Following dispatch has been received from General Kenly:

HARPER'S FERRY, W. VA., December 26, 1862-1 p.m.

Colonel WILLIAM D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have 1,000 infantry, one battery of artillery, and 60 cavalry at Harper's Ferry, on the Virginia side, to defend the town and the Heights. On Maryland Heights, 500 artillerists, 1,500 infantry, and 100 cavalry, disposed of to the best of my judgment, but utterly insufficient to defend the lines I am attempting to defend. There are 1,000 sick, left here by the Twelfth Corps. I have ordered them away; for, if forced to abandon Harper's Ferry Heights, I cannot save my troops and the sick. I shall hold Maryland Heights at all hazards.

JOHN R. KENLY,

Brigadier-General.

There seems to me no present occasion for apprehension as to Harper's Ferry. I sent you this morning General Kelley's last dispatch, announcing General Cluseret still safe at Winchester, but I send to-day all the remaining force I have to spare to re-enforce General Kelley, to wit: Six companies of Sixth New York Artillery, two large siege guns, and Seventeenth Indiana Battery, 103 men, and six rifled guns.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 27, 1862.

Major-General BURNSIDE,

Falmouth, Va.:

Last news from Harper's Ferry would indicate that the enemy's force is not so large as at first supposed. They are trying to make you play the game of shuttlecock, by sending troops backward and forward to Harper's Ferry.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

FAIRFAX COURT-HOUSE, December 27, 1862.

Major-General SIGEL,

Washington:

I have just received the following dispatch:

DUMFRIES, 3.45 p.m.

Major-General SLOCUM:

Send re-enforcements at once. I am attacked here. Will hold my position as long as possible. This is a verbal order from Colonel Charles Candy, who is now fighting. He told me to send the message.

HALL,

Operator.

H. W. SLOCUM.