War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0845 Chapter XXXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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into six-mule teams. We want some more horses, particularly for ambulances. If you will inform me what you can do, I will state the numbers now required.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster.

HEADQUARTERS CENTER GRAND DIVISION,

Camp near Potomac Creek, Va., December 10, 1862.

Brigadier General W. W. AVERELL,

Commanding Cavalry Brigade:

I am directed by the major-general commanding to request you to move with your command to a position in rear of the corps of General Butterfield, which will be directly across the Rappahannock from Fredericksburg, with three days' rations and forage issued to your men, the residue to be in wagons. General Butterfield will be established in his new position, in readiness to cross the river at 9 a.m. to-morrow, and it is the desire of the general that your command should be there on or before 10 o'clock of the same morning. No vehicles will cross until further orders, but the train should be compactly parked near you, ready to move at a moment's notice. The commanding general requests that all the avenues leading down to the Rappahannock be left open, and that you will regard this in taking your new position.

Very respectfully,

JOS. DICKINSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS CENTER GRAND DIVISION,

Camp near Potomac Creek, Va., December 10, 1862.

Brigadier General GEORGE STONEMAN,

Commanding Third Corps:

GENERAL: I am directed by the major-general commanding the center grand division to request you will send out suitable staff officers to select the position your corps is to take preparatory to crossing the Rappahannock, and to determine the best route to approach it from our camp. The crossing will be by three bridges, directly opposite from Fredericksburg, the center grand division being preceded by Sumner's infantry and artillery. The Third Corps will take the right, and each division, with the artillery serving with it, in rear of the infantry, will cross its own bridges at the same moment, followed immediately by the Fifth Corps in the same manner. No vehicles will cross until further orders, but the trains will be carefully parked in the vicinity of the crossing, beyond the reach of artillery, ready to stretch out at a moment's notice. Ammunition wagons in the advance, followed by the ambulances and other trains. Care must be taken in selecting positions for the troops and trains that no one of the avenues leading to the river be blocked; they must be kept open for such other use as may be necessary. The major-general commanding directs that these dispositions be completed on or before 9 a.m. on the 11th instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOS. DICKINSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

(A similar letter sent to Brigadier-General Butterfield, commanding Fifth Corps.)