War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0841 Chapter XXXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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park near Phillips' house by dark. At midnight trains to move down within 400 yards of river, and to move down and begin unloading at 3 a.m.

If enemy's fire is kept down, bridges to be thrown as soon as boats are unloaded; if too hot, wait till artillery silences it.

Upper two bridges to be covered by two regiments of infantry; canal-boat bridge by one regiment; two lower bridges by two regiments and a 12-pounder battery.

Corduroy at Skinker's Neck to be laid during to-morrow night; woods to be felled, &c.

As soon as pontoons are on bank of river, all teams to be taken away.

C. B. COMSTOCK,

Lieutenant of Engineers and Chief Engineer Army of the Potomac.

[P. S.]-At upper two bridges two pontoon wagons to be loaded with seven balks and twenty-one chasses, with lashings each, ready for General Sumner to take with him. At canal bridge one such wagon, same at two lower bridges, 2 men with each wagon.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY BRIGADE, December 8, 1862.

Major-General PARKE,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: Colonel Gregg's pickets captured to-day First Lieutenant John A. Billingsley, Ninth Virginia Cavalry, and Lieutenant James Carey, of the rebel signal corps. Carey's orders from Richmond, directing him to proceed to King George and Westmoreland Counties for certain signal property of the rebels, I have forwarded to General Sumner. They might, however, attempt to set up a signal station on this side. Having their spies within our lines, I would respectfully suggest that all these people captured and sent in be for the present retained in custody.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY BRIGADE, December 8, 1862.

Major-General PARKE,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I omitted to mention that Lieutenant Carey, the signal officer captured to-day, was taken in citizen's dress. I am also informed the rebels have a uniform for their signal corps. This certainly places Lieutenant Carey in an unpleasant position, and one which should be thoroughly investigated. It certainly looks very suspicious to find one of his corps on this side of the river.

Very respectfully,

A. PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General.

SIGEL'S HEADQUARTERS, December 8, 1862.

Major-General BURNSIDE and

Major-General HEINTZELMAN:

The patrols and scouts who have come in during the night and morning report no enemy near Wolf Run Shoals, at Brentsville, Greenwich,