War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0831 Chapter XXXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS CAVALRY BRIGADE, December 5, 1862.

Major-General PARKE,

Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: I re-enforced Colonel Gregg yesterday by the Eighth New York and Third Indiana Cavalry, say, 800 men. I shall direct Colonel Gregg to inform me if he thinks it unsafe to leave the section of artillery at the Court-House, and to send it in at any time he may be apprehensive of losing it. Colonel Gregg has about 1,300 men with him. The two deserters from Fifteenth Virginia Cavalry report there have been no rations issued them for three weeks, and for the last three days they have lived on berries and persimmons; that their horses are in wretched condition, and that the rebel soldiers are discontented for want of pay, six months' being due them. These men were volunteers. I have sent them to the provost-marshal-general.

Very respectfully,

A. PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding Cavalry.

HEADQUARTERS SICKLES' DIVISION, THIRD CORPS,

Camp near Falmouth, Va., December 5, 1862.

Lieutenant A. J. ALEXANDER,

Asst. Adjt. General, Third Corps, Center Grand Division:

LIEUTENANT:I have the honor to report that I have been unable at yet to obtain a supply train or a train for my reserve artillery ammunition. The necessary requisitions, duly approved, were sent in immediately after my arrival here, and, although pressed from day to day, no issues have been made on them. With reference to subsistence, especially, and also to forage, I have more on hand than I could move with my present means of transportation. Of forage, I have about ten days' supply, and of subsistence, about seven average. Large trains have gone to the depot daily, usually returning with half loads, owing to the deficiency of the supply on hand. Sometimes the trains have been obliged to return empty. Having been unable to obtain transportation while at Manassas, or on the Occoquan, for reserve artillery ammunition, the ordnance officer of the division moved the most of it to Washington by railroad, and thence by water to Aquia, where it remains. I have thought it inexpedient to send for it while I am without a train for its transportation on the march.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your most obedient servant,

D. E. SICKLES,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

WASHINGTON, December 6, 1862-4 p.m.

Major General AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE:

General Slocum has about 14,000, Morell 7,000, and Kelley, including Milroy, 12,000. About 14,000 can be spared, say, Slocum, or Morell and a part of Slocum's. No large force should be sent to Winchester till we are ready to advance, on account of difficulty of supplies. All else approved. Please telegraph me copy of your order. I am re-enforcing General Dix as much as possible for a strike with gunboats.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.