War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0829 Chapter XXXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, December 4, 1862.

Major-General WOOL,

Baltimore, Md.:

The enemy having abandoned the Shenandoah Valley, there can be no immediate danger of a raid on Baltimore or the railroads, and a portion of the troops for the defense of these places can, it is believed, be safely sent to the army of the Rappahannock. Please telegraph what forces, in your opinion, can be spared from your department, exclusive of those on the Upper Potomac.

H. W. POTOMAC,

General-in-Chief.

BALTIMORE, MD., December 4, 1862-10.10 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I have received your dispatch. I think I can spare three regiments and a battery of six pieces-one regiment from Ellicott's Mills and two from the Northern Central Railroad. If necessary, hereafter they can be replaced by drafted militia. Let me know when you desire the troops sent.

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

CUMBERLAND, MD., December 4, 1862-1.10 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

A detachment of my cavalry from New Creek had a brilliant and successful skirmish yesterday at Moorefield, in Hardy County, with a detachment of Stuart's cavalry. I am directed by General Cox to represent to you the necessity of keeping a force on the railroad and in the valley of the South Branch of the Potomac sufficient to protect the road and the loyal people, and to repel Imboden or any force that may come down the valley from the Warm Springs, or across from the Shenandoah Valley.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.

CUMBERLAND, December 4, 1862.

Major BASCOM,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

A detachment of our cavalry, composed of a portion of the Ringgold Battalion and Captain Rowan's company, First Virginia, under command of Lieutenant Myers, of the Ringgold Battalion, had a brilliant and successful skirmish yesterday with two companies of Stuart's cavalry, at Moorefield, Hardy County, West Virginia. Lieutenant Myers attacked them and routed them completely, compelling them to fly in every direction. Killed and wounded several, and captured Captain McDonald, with 9 of his men, arms, horses, &c. Lieutenant Myers had 1 man wounded and 3 horses killed.

B. F. KELLEY,

Brigadier-General.