War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0787 Chapter XXXIII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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have made none of the reports called for since I assumed command, and I am quite in the dark as to the organization and effective force of your command, and your means of transportation, &c. Whether in posts or in the field, promptness in forwarding reports is indispensable. While detained at New Creek, please give thorough attention to all matters of organization and discipline, and especially to those above mentioned.

J. D. COX,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

November 22, 1862-9 p.m. (Received 9.15. p.m.)

Honorable GIDEON WELLES,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington:

Will it be possible for you to send two or three gunboats up the Rappahannock River, to co-operate with this army?

A. E. BURNSIDE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

November 22, 1862.

General PARKE:

It is reported that the enemy has thrown up earthworks above the town. I have sent out a reconnaissance. If the report proves true, what does the commanding general wish done?

E. V. SUMNER,

Brevet Major-General, U. S. Army.

HEADQUARTERS RIGHT GRAND DIVISION,

November 22, 1862.

General J. G. PARKE:

The mayor and several councilmen came over this morning, accompanied by two military officers of rank. They were told that the invitation was only given to the authorities of the town, and the military men were requested to go back; whereupon the whole party returned over the river.

E. V. SUMNER,

Brevet Major-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.