War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0709 Chapter XXXIII. RAID ON DUMFRIES AND FAIRFAX STATION, ETC.

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Pennsylvania Cavalry during their retreat. Several of their men were shot while crossing the ford, but the number of them could not be ascertained, as they either carried them off or secreted the bodies. When I receive Captain Chauncey's report I will communicate it.

I have this moment learned the following particulars from a prisoner just brought in from Wolf Run Shoals: The rebel column left Guiney's Station about 20 miles the other side of Gordonsville. It consisted of about 7,000 men, under command of Generals Lee, Stuart, and Hampton. The prisoner does not know how many of that number came this side of Dumfries.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. BUTLER PRICE,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

Major HUNT,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Defenses of Washington.

HDQRS. CAVALRY Brigadier, DEFENSES OF WASHINGTON,

December 30, 1862.

MAJOR: Major Taggart, on his way to Annandale yesterday, met the pickets of the enemy at Frying Pan. His advance drove them in. On coming up with his column, he found them too strong for him, and turned off to the left and reached Annandale safely. Fearing the company left at Dranesville might be picked up, he sent an order back for them to remove with wagons, &c., to Lewinsville.

On Major Taggart's arrival at Annandale, General Abercrombie's troops had orders to move, and he had preceded them. He overtook him before reaching Arlington, and received an order to report to Colonel Wilkeson, of Scott's Nine Hundred, and follow the enemy. Colonel Wilkeson is not there. Major Taggart desires to know if he shall return to Dranesville, or what course to pursue. He estimates the number of the enemy from 2,500 to 3,000 and twelve pieces of artillery, corresponding nearly with the most reliable accounts received.

An officer, Lieutenant Eckert, of the Second, has this moment come in from Wolf Run Shoals, to which place he made his way after the fight the other side of the Occoquan. He brings nothing of importance but what you already know. He distinctly saw all the enemy, and says there was not less than 3,000.

I must do the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry the credit to say that from all accounts I get they behaved very well. The men were rallied three or four times, and fought as long as it was possible. They were attacked by one entire regiment, the others being held in reserve on the hill beyond.

Chauncey, who commanded the party, was deserted by the Seventeenth Pennsylvania (of which there were present about 150) at the first fire. They did not stand a moment. I have not yet received any report from Captain Chauncey.

Two officers and about 60 men of the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry are missing; some killed, but it is not known how many. Captain Brinton has crossed the Occoquan this morning in search of wounded. The surgeon of the Second Pennsylvania Cavalry remained on the field to look after the wounded.

I am, very respectfully, yours,

R. BUTLER PRICE,

Colonel, Commanding Brigade.

Major HUNT,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. General, Defenses of Washington.