War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0218 OPERATIONS IN N.VA.,W.VA.,MD.,AND PA. Chapter XXXIII.

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I have no casualties to report. I have expended 201 rounds of ammunition. I have not yet been ordered to rejoin my division.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. BRUCE RICKETTS,

Lieutenant, Commanding Battery F, First Pennsylvania Artillery.

Captain GEORGE F. LETTIEN,

Chief of Artillery, Second Division, First Corps.

CAMP BELOW FALMOUTH, VA., December 19, 1862.

SIR: In obedience to an order from headquarters left grand division, dated December 9, 1862, I reported to you on the morning of 10th of December, and the same night, by your order, took a position on the bluffs above Pollock's Mill.

On Thursday, December 11, I assisted in covering the crossing of the left grand division at the lower pontoon bridges.

On Saturday, December 13, Sunday, December 14, Monday, December 15, the battery under my command was engaged in shelling the enemy's batteries and troops on General Franklin's left, from the north bank of the Rappahannock.

I have no casualties to report. I have expended 201 rounds of ammunition.

I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. BRUCE RICKETTS,

Lieutenant, Commanding Battery F, First Pennsylvania Artillery.

Captain DE RUSSY,

Commanding Artillery on the Left.

No. 51. Report of Major General Edwin V. Sumner, U. S. Army, commanding Right Grand Division.

HEADQUARTERS RIGHT GRAND DIVISION, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

January 14, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report of the operations of my command during the actions at and near Fredericksburg:

It was intended that my grand division should cross on two pontoon bridges-the upper one to be thrown at the Lacy house, and the other at the old steamboat landing. The work of the bridge-builders commenced at daylight on the morning of December 11, covered by guns, under charge of the chief of artillery. Army of the Potomac, crowning the crest on the left bank of river, and supported by infantry lying under the crest. The pontoniers were annoyed during the day by the fire of the enemy's sharpshooters, secreted in the house near the proposed landing of the bridges, whom the artillery fire, directed upon the houses, failed to drive. The Engineer Brigade failing to accomplish its assigned work under the fire it met, troops crossed the river, at the two points selected for the bridges, in boats, and carried handsomely the houses and shelters occupied by the enemy, and suffering sharply, but inflicting severe loss on the enemy in killed, wounded, and prisoners. The Seventh Michigan and Nineteenth and Twentieth Massachusetts