War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0201 Chapter XXXIII. BATTLE OF FREDERICKSBURG, VA.

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No. 32. Report of Captain Otto Diederichs, Battery A, First Battalion New York Light Artillery.

POSITION HUNT, December 19, 1862.

COLONEL: I have the honor to bring the following report of the late engagement opposite Fredericksburg under your notice:

My battery consisted of four 20-pounder Parrott rifle guns. I received on the 10th instant, in the morning, the order from Colonel Hays to report to you. The battery moved on the same night on the hills opposite Fredericksburg, hostilities commencing on the 11th instant, in the early part of the day, and I received the order to shell the city. I fired, on the morning of the 11th, 50 rounds, with 4 degrees and 6 seconds time, by very dark weather,and on the afternoon 53 rounds, with 3 1/2 degrees and 5 seconds time, by fine weather. On the next day I received the order to shell the enemy's front and left batteries, and I fired 22 rounds the whole day over, 9 shells in rear of the front battery, with 10 1/2 degrees and 16 seconds time, and 13 in rear of the left, in he woods, with 7 1/2 degrees and 12 seconds time. Two of the last rounds exploded in very short distance, one right straight for the muzzle, and the other one about 100 yards far away.

On the 13th instant, I was ordered to shell the same batteries of the enemy again, and I fired through the whole day 63 rounds; 19 shot of the front batteries, with 10 1/2 degrees and 16 seconds time; 17 shot to the left, with 10 1/2 degrees and 16 seconds time, and 27 to the left again, with 9 1/2 degrees and 12 seconds time. One of Schenkl percussion shells exploded but 20 yards in front of the muzzle.

On the 14th instant, the battery only fired 4 rounds to the same direction. Altogether, from the 11th to include the 14th instant, my battery fired 192 rounds, the most of the shots being effective. In the whole engagement I lost no men nor horses.

The battery is in the same position at present. I find it necessary to inform you herewith, colonel, that the most of the ammunition in general is very bad, particularly fuses and friction primers. The most of the fuses are too small for the use of 20-pounder Parrott guns, and I was forced to put hemp and paper on nearly every single one. Many of the friction primers are too large size, and many of the shells have holes, which, I believe, make the soon explosions.

I remain, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

O. DIEDERICHS,

Captain, Commanding Battery A, First New York Art. Battalion.

Colonel R. O. TYLER,

Commanding Artillery.

No. 33. Report of Captain Adolph Voegelee, Battery B, First Battalion New York Light Artillery.

POSITION HUNT, December 19, 1862.

COLONEL: I have the honor to bring the following report of the late engagement near Fredericksburg under your notice:

My battery, consisting of four 20-pounder Parrotts, had been ordered