War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0146 OPERATIONS IN N. VA., W. VA., MD., AND PA.

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[CHAP. XXXIII.

30, 1863.* I take great pleasure in submitting to you the substance of the reports referred to, so far as relates to the time you were in command.

At the time you assumed command of this army, November 9, 1862, my records show that, exclusive of the force about Washington, there were present 3,911 army wagons, 907 ambulances, 7,139 artillery, 9,582 cavalry, 8,693 team horses, and 12,483 mules, making 37,897 animals. The army had recently crossed the Potomac at Berlin, marching by way of Salem and Rectortown.

On the 9th the headquarters were at Warrenton. It was well supplied with means of transportation, clothing, and forage. Our supplied had been received during October by the canal, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, and the Cumberland Valley Railroad, while the army stretched from Williamsport to Berlin.

On arriving at Warrenton our supplied were sent out on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad and on the Manassas Gap and Warrenton branches. This road was in bad condition, and those best acquainted with its capacity, from actual experience and observation, as General Haupt and Lieutenant Colonel F. Myers, reported that it could not be safely relied on to supply so large an army. After passing over the road I was of the same opinion.

It is proper to remark, however, that since then the road has been vastly improved. A large construction party has been constantly kept upon it for many months past. New ties and rails have been put in where necessary; new bridges have been built; the rolling-stock has been increased, and the road has been conducted by Colonel J. H. Devereux, a most energetic, systematic, and skillful superintendent, so that to-day the road can supply an army of 150,000 men certainly as far as Culpeper. At that time the Third, Eleventh, and Twelfth Corps were not serving immediately with the army. It is necessary to be reminded of this, in order to understand the comparatively small number of wagons, horses, and mules reported on hand when you assumed command.

In my report to General McClellan I state "that subsequently our trains were increased to near 6,000 wagons and 60,000 animals of all kinds. After the Eleventh and Twelfth Corps had joined, we could then haul ten days' supply."

The following is my recapitulation of the means of transportation present with the forces when you relinquished the command, January 26, 1863:

Wagons. Ambulan Teams Cavalry

ces. and horses.

Command. ambulanc

es

horses

Headquarters Army of the

Potomac and in depot. 367 21 606 1,675

Right Grand Division

(Sumner's) 1,294 329 2,687 3,836

Left Grand Division

(Franklin's) 1,426 406 3,506 4,357

Center Grand Division

(Hooker's) 1,250 361 2,732 3,336

Eleventh Corps (Sigel's) 549 117 1,744 2,647

Twelfth Corps (Slocum's) 470 125 1,185 171

Artillery Reserve (De

Russy's) 367 12 462 ---

Kenly's brigade 103 22 160 1,512

Detached cavalry (North

Mountain) 41 2 157 1,345

Engineer Brigade

(Woodbury's) 113 8 1,146 ---

Grand total in Army of

Potomac. 5,980 1,403 14,385 18,879

Artille Mules. Total

Command. ry animals

horses. .

Headquarters Army of the

Potomac and in depot. --- 1,108 1,389

Right Grand Division

(Sumner's) 2,019 5,116 13,658

Left Grand Division

(Franklin's) 2,292 4,880 15,035

Center Grand Division

(Hooker's) 2,030 4,990 13,088

Eleventh Corps (Sigel's) 894 1,257 6,542

Twelfth Corps (Slocum's) 656 1,270 3,282

Artillery Reserve (De

Russy's) 1,434 1,039 2,935

Kenly's brigade 339 309 2,320

Detached cavalry (North

Mountain) --- 12 1,514

Engineer Brigade

(Woodbury's) --- 284 1,430

Grand total in Army of

Potomac. 9,664 20,265 63,193

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*See Series I, Vol. XIX, Part I, pp. 99-106.

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