War of the Rebellion: Serial 031 Page 0127 Chapter XXXIII. BATTLE OF FREDERICKSBURG, VA.

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judge about 20,000 have passed through a field, and they are still coming. They are accompanied with some artillery, but I have only been able to see one battery-light artillery.

Yours, &c.,

B. F. FISHER,

Captain and Acting Signal Officer.

HEADQUARTERS RIGHT GRAND DIVISION,

ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

December 16, 1862-3.30 a.m.

Colonel LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: About two hours ago the Second Corps had crossed, and a part of the Ninth. I expect they are all over now. There has been no interruption in the movement.

Respectfully, yours,

E. V. SUMNER,

Brevet Major-General, U. S. Army, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS,

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

Numbers 7.

Camp near Falmouth, Va., January 20, 1863.

The commanding general announces to the Army of the Potomac that they are about to meet the enemy once more.

The late brilliant actions in North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas have divided and weakened the enemy on the Rappahannock, and the auspicious moment seems to have arrived to strike a great and mortal blow to the rebellion, and to gain that decisive victory which is due to the country.

Let the gallant soldiers of so many brilliant battle-fields accomplish this achievement, and a fame the most glorious awaits them.

The commanding general calls for the firm and united action of officers and men, and, under the providence of God, the Army of the Potomac will have taken a great step toward restoring peace to the country and the Government to its rightful authority.

By command of Major-General Burnside:

LEWIS RICHMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Statement of Captain P. M. Lydig, Aide-de-Camp.

CINCINNATI, OHIO, March 31, 1863.

On Saturday morning, about 10.30, I received orders from General Burnside to go to General Franklin, commanding the left grand division, and learn from him the disposition of the troops under his command, and what forces were then engaged.

I found General Franklin in a grove of trees in the center of his command, and, on delivering my message, I was informed by him that Meade was very hotly engaged; that Gibbon had just gone into the