War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0483 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

no report from him as to whether they yet occupy their camp or not. I expect a report soon, and will immediately advise you.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

JNumbers A. WHARTON,

Brigadier-general, Commanding Cavalry Brigade.

HEADQUARTERS WHARTON'S CAVALRY BRIGADE,

The miles from Murfreesborough, January 4, 1863-6 p. m.

[Major-General CHEATHAM:]

GENERAL: At 2.30 o'clock this afternoon the enemy were advancing upon Murfreesborough very slowly and with great caution. I have three regiments, 6 miles this [side] of the town, where they will remain tonight, and the balance of my command I have with me here, 10 miles from town. You need feel no uneasiness, and your command can rest in perfect security. Your rear is well guarded. All stragglers I keep before me. I will advise you promptly of any movement of the enemy.

The above in regard to the enemy's advance on Murfreesborough is reported to me, but I don't believe it. Please send this to General Polk.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

JNumbers A. WHARTON,

Brigadier-General.

[Indorsement.]

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION,

January 4, 1863.

Lieutenant-general Polk:

SIR: My command will move forward promptly at daylight in the morning.

Yours, respectfully,

B. F. CHEATHAM,

Major-General, Commanding.

ABINGDON, January 4, 1863.

Major T. W. W. DAVIES,

Commanding Post, Bristol:

A telegram from Bristol to a gentleman here reports that Marshall has cut off the bridge-burners (Carter's men), and that it is thought they (Carter's men) will attempt to come by Bristol. Give me the latest news from Marshall and Colonel Dunn, and the movements of Carter's men. If they are attempting to come by Bristol, General Floyd can send a force to meet them. Answer immediately.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, Va., January 4, 1863.

Lieutenant gen KIRBY SMITH,

General Commanding, &c.:

SIR: I have received your telegrams, giving information of the recent foray of the enemy's cavalry in East Tennessee, and the burning of the bridges on the east Tennessee and Virginia Railroad. The occurrence is greatly to be regretted, and must subject the Government to serious inconvenience, but no censure is attached to you by the Department on