War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0478 KY.,MID.AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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AUGUSTA, January 2, 1863.

Hon. JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

Enemy, 2,000 strong, under General Carter, reported to have made an incursion through Pendleton Gap, to have burned the Holston and Watauga Railroad bridges, and to be at Jonesborough, with design of destroying Saltville. Suggest that arrangements be made at once to capture the incursionists by Marshall's corps and other available forces.

JEFFERSON DAVIS.

RICHMOND, January 2, 1863.

Major General SAMUEL JONES:

A telegram from the President, referring to the reported movements of the enemy on Holston and Watauga Railroad, says: "Suggest arrangements to be made at once to capture the incursionists by Marshall's and other available force."

J. A. SEDDON.

GLADE SPRING, January 2, 1863.

Major General SAMUEL JONES:

The last accounts are that the enemy is retreating westward. I am informed that a large force is at Pound Gap. This seems to be confirmed by a Cincinnati paper. If true, the force in this section is not sufficient to hold it. Can you not come to Abingdon to-night?

JOHN B. FLOYD,

Major-General, Virginia State Line.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA, Dublin, January 2, 1863.

Col. JOHN McCAUSLAND,

Commanding, &c.:

COLONEL: The major-general commanding directs me to say that he has received information leading him to believe that the enemy are in strong force at Pound Gap. He goes forward to-day to make more diligent investigations. You will, therefore, hold your command in readiness to move at short notice, and, in the event of Colonel Wharton being ordered from the Narrows, you will fall back and take position at that point.

Very respectfully, &c.,

CHAS. S. STRINGFELLOW,

[Assistant Adjutant-General.]

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA, Dublin, January 2, 1863.

Col. G. C. WHARTON,

Commanding, &c.:

COLONEL: The major-general commanding directs me to say that he has received information leading him to believe that the enemy are in large force at or near Pound Gap, and he goes to-day to Bristol, &c., to make more diligent investigation. You will, therefore, hold your command in readiness to move to this point at short notice for the protection of the railroad.

Very respectfully, &c.,

CHAS. S. STRINGFELLOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.