War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0475 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC.-CONFEDERATE.

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Return of the Department of East Tennessee, commanded by Lieut. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, for December, 1862; headquarters Knoxville, Tenn.

Present for duty

Infantry Cavalry

Command Officers Men Officers Men

Department staff - - - -

District, Brigade - - - -

er Gen. H. Heth

commanding

Cumberland Gap, 122 1,615 13 261

Brig. Gen. A.

Gracie, jr.

commanding

Big Creek Gap, 90 943 28 829

Col. J. B. Palmer,

commanding

Clinton 17 247 - -

Scott County - - 29 328

First Brigade, 39 355 15 149

en route to

Stawberry Plains

and Morristown,

Brig. Gen. W. G. M.

Davis

Detachments 112 2,081 20 200

infantry,

cavalry, and

artillery

Grand total 380 5,241 105 1,267

Artillery

Command Officers Men Aggregate Aggregate

present present

and

absent

Department staff - - 16 16

District, Brigade - - 9 9

er Gen. H. Heth

commanding

Cumberland Gap, 4 98 2,626 4,664

Brig. Gen. A.

Gracie, jr.

commanding

Big Creek Gap, 5 79 1,976 3,631

Col. J. B. Palmer,

commanding

Clinton - - 352 528

Scott County - - 384 665

First Brigade, 3 57 854 1,870

en route to

Stawberry Plains

and Morristown,

Brig. Gen. W. G. M.

Davis

Detachments 2 55 3,051 4,052

infantry,

cavalry, and

artillery

Grand total 14 289 9,268 15,435

JACKSON, MISS., January 1, 1863.

General BRAGG, Murfreesborough:

I congratulate you on your glorious termination of last year. Direct Forrest and Roddey to send to Grenada for my instruction.

J. E. JOHNSTON,

General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA, Dublin, January 1, 1863.

Lieut. Gen. E. KIRBY SMITH, Knoxville:

GENERAL: Your telegram of the 29th was received about 10 o'clock the next morning. One from Brigadier-General Marshall was received at the same time. I immediately ordered all my available troops, Brigadier-General Marshall commanding, to Bristol, and communicated the information to Brigadier-General Floyd. Marshall reports that he is in pursuit of the enemy. Floyd is also moving against them, and if they attempt to escape into Kentucky by way of Pound Gap, I have strong hope that they will be overtaken and severely punished. I regret exceedingly that I did not receive earlier information of this movement of the enemy, and of your inability to meet them with a sufficient force. I was under the impression that one of your general officers was commanding at Cumberland Gap, and I supposed with a sufficient force either to have prevented the passage of so large a body of cavalry so near the gap or to have given information of their approach. On the 19th instant I addressed a letter to Brigadier-General Heth, commanding Department of East Tennessee, suggesting that it was desirable I should have the earliest information of any movement of the enemy in that direction, and asking that he would keep me advised on that point but have not heard from him in reply. I shall send, by the train to-day, to Bristol, Captain Robinson, of the engineers, on my staff, to examine and report the extent of the damage done the railroad in East Tennessee, and to make an estimate of the time and cost of repairs. I am sure you