War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0406 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA., AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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assistance. It is essential to the proper management of the department that the enrollment of conscripts should be under the orders of the commander of the department.

I remain, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. KIRBY SMITH,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

[Indorsement.]

NOVEMBER 22, 1862.

To ADJUTANT-GENERAL:

There is weight in General Smith's suggestion. How had it best be accomplished? Shall the whole matter be committed to him, or the enrolling officers merely be directed to report to him, and pursue any instructions he may give?

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary.

To SECRETARY OF WAR:

I respectfully suggest that a special order be issued in the following terms:

Enrolling officers in the Department of East Tennessee will report through the commandant of conscripts to the general commanding the department, who is hereby authorized to give such instructions, not inconsistent with acts of Congress, and to render such aid as may be necessary for the enforcement of the conscript laws.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

The suggestions of the Adjutant-General approved. He will issue order conformably.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary.

OFFICE EAST TENNESSEE AND GEORGIA RAILROAD CO., Knoxville, November 17, 1862.

Lieut. Gen. E. KIRBY SMITH:

DEAR SIR: The condition of the engines and cars of this company is such that it will be impossible for os to do the work of the Confederate States more than sixty days longer. We must have two more good engines and at least fifty box cars. We h ave bought all we could find for sale, and paid exorbitant prices, and we are willing to purchase and pay cash for more at extravagant prices. This is an emergency with us, and, unless remedied immediately, will be felt severely within the next sixty days be the army. There are engines and cars enough in the South to sustain the main lines for the next three or four years. There are many branch roads that have cars and engines of no kin of use in these times to either the public or the Confederate States, but we have no power to force a sale. If the War Department will cause us to be supplied with the stock, we will cheerfully pay not only liberal but extravagant prices for it. I have never heard of any disposition being made of the engines and cars captured on the Louisville and Nashville road, and presume they are in possession of the Nashville and Chattanooga road. One of these engines, at least, is well adapted to our grades. I have brought this matter before the Quartermaster-General