War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0341 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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MURFREESBOROUGH, January 20, 1863.

Brigadier-General MITCHELL, Nashville:

Your reply to Secretary of War as to Anderson Troop is approved by general commanding. He asks what force is required to clear out the rebel force on the Shoals? How many are there? He also asks how the devil the rascals burn so many boats, for he cannot understand how it is done if those in charge of them do their duty, or make any attempt to defend them.

FRANK S. BOND,

Aide-de-Camp.

MURFREESBOROUGH, January 20, 1863.

General GORDON GRANGER, Louisville:

I wish two brigades and all the cavalry to land at Clarksville, and clear the rebels out of the country. Hope you can find boats to accommodate the horses; if not, I want all the infantry landed at Nashville as soon as possible. Major-General Wright telegraphed that Crook left Cincinnati with another brigade yesterday morning.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., January 20, 1863-11.30 a. m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

Have just sent the following to the Secretary of the Navy:

General Mitchell, commanding at Nashville, telegraphs as follows:

"Officers of gunboats refuse to report here. I have refused to sign provision returns until they report. They say they have but three days' rations, and will haul down the river before we can have the fleet ready."

In your telegram of 13th you say Captain Pennock will co-operate under general instructions from you. It is important that I should know just what co-operation to expect. Some superior officer should be stationed at Nashville, with whom I can concert measures. If the boats run independent of my wishes, they are not only of little use for the purpose for which they are sent, but endanger their own safety and that of the transports they convoy. I desire, also, to use them to destroy ferriage on Cumberland, above Nashville. I do not wish to command the boats, but, to make them efficient, hearty co-operation is indispensable. Have telegraphed Captain Pennock twice without reply.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

MURFREESBOROUGH, January 20, 1863.

Brigadier General M. C. MEIGS:

Your dispatch received and suggestions marked, as to protecting machinery and pilot-houses with cargo. Orders have been given to carry them into effect.

There are some horses in the country for Forrest to steal, but, if we can get a start, we mean to steal them ourselves. Our men have commenced to practice unofficially in this way. Unfortunately the quartermaster's department has been the chief sufferer so far.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.