War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0331 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City, D. C., January 15, 1863-4.40 p. m.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Murfreesborough:

You may exercise your discretion in granting short leaves of absence, but cannot be too careful in its exercise. All the revolving rifles that are manufactured in this country have been sent you, and more will be sent as fast as they can be procured. We can send you revolving pistols and horse equipments. Specify the number you require. Make requisition for them on the Ordnance Bureau by telegram, and state by what route they shall be sent. The Quartermaster-General is doing all he can to procure horses. You may buy horses and saddles if you can procure them. Orders have been given to provide transports, such as you desire, as fast as they can be procured.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 15, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

I am informed by the Chief of Ordnance that of the 5,000 saddles in your requisition 2,500 have been delivered; 2,000 are on the way from Saint Louis, and the remaining 500 will soon follow. The Quartermaster's Department is authorized to fill your requisitions for horses. In the present condition of the Treasury, purchases are difficult. Cannot your partially supply yourself with horses in the country?

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, January 15, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Murfreesborough, Tenn.:

I learn from the Navy Department that they have fifteen small gunboats ready to patrol the Cumberland and Tennessee, and have authorized fifteen more. For convoys of transports, telegraph to Captain Pennock, at Cairo, and also, when possible, communicate with Admiral Porter. Urge on Captain Pennock to put in the Cumberland all the gunboats he can.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

MURFREESBOROUGH, TENN., January 15, 1863.

General MEIGS:

Captain Jenkins was our dependence, but lately we have also telegraphed General Allen, at Saint Louis. What I want is enough horses to mount about 8,000 infantry in cases of emergency, and these, with our pack-mules, when received, will enable us to smash up all their cavalry, and get all the horses in the country. At present the rebels have 10,000 or 12,000 cavalry, and have things their own way.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.