War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0300 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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The country is filled with admiration of the gallantry and heroic achievement of yourself and the officers and troops under your command, and we are anxiously waiting for further intelligence.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND, January 5, 1863.

Major-General CRITTENDEN,

Left Wing:

GENERAL: The general commanding desires to know what it the meaning of the skirmishing in your front and rear. He directs that you take immediate measures to prevent this ridiculous and annoying waste of ammunition.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. GODDARD,

Major and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTH DIVISION,

Murfreesborough, Tenn., January 5, 1863-7 p.m.

Major GEORGE E. FLYNT,

Chief of Staff:

SIR: General Spears' brigade has returned. His advance regiment found the enemy (cavalry dismounted) in considerable force, with artillery. The regiment charged their front, and forced them to retire a short distance. A number of enemy killed, and some prisoners taken, which I will send you. Our loss 4 killed, 11 wounded.

Yours, very truly,

JAS. S. NEGLEY,

Brigadier-General.

ON MANCHESTER ROAD,

Lytle's Creek, 3 1/2 miles from town, January 5, 1863-12 m.

GENERAL: The enemy are in strong cavalry force, and, as near as I can find out, have four pieces of artillery. They have destroyed the bridge here. It could be soon fixed. A boy just taken says Pegram commands the rear guard, and has ten guns. I can cross the creek, and will do so. I fear their artillery is too much for me.

D. S. STANLEY,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS CENTER, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Murfreesborough, January 5, 1863.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Comdg. Fourteenth Army Corps, Dept. of the Cumberland:

GENERAL: I occupy Murfreesborough with Generals Negley and Rousseau's divisions. General Stanley had followed up the enemy with his cavalry on his two routes of retreat, Shelbyville and Manchester pikes. From the best information I can obtain, the main body of their infantry and artillery went out by the Manchester pike, both columns