War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0294 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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LOUISVILLE, January 2, 1863.

Major-General WRIGHT:

Morgan passed through Columbia at 9 o'clock yesterday, Colonel Hoskins skirmishing with his rear. Colonel Wolford was at Greensburg at 7 p.m., and started in pursuit. Morgan burned Green River Bridge, but did not delay Colonel Hoskins, who, from last accounts, is pressing Morgan. Morgan abandoned his train and caissons. Green River Bridge, on Columbia pike, is important. Shall I have it rebuilt?

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., January 2, 1863-11 a.m.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

I trust Colonel Carrington will be permitted to remain here for the present. He is the man for the emergency, and there are great signs of trouble here, such as I cannot telegraph. I write you to-day. Please suspend his removal from command here until you receive my letter.

O. P. MORTON,

Governor of Indiana.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, January 3, 1863.

Major C. GODDARD,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General:

MAJOR:Immediately upon receiving your last note I summoned the division commanders to a consultation. All thought the danger of a sudden rise in the river imminent. I therefore immediately ordered the troops to cross over. [Two] batteries have already crossed, and all the troops are moving [without] confusion. I hope to have all over by daylight. My only difficulty [is to] know what disposition to make of the troops after they are over. I do not [know] the present position of the other troops of the command. As soon as the batteries are over, I will ride up and see you upon the subject. The men must be located where they can build fires and dry their clothes and get some rest.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, January 3, 1863-10 p.m.

Major C. GODDARD,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General"

MAJOR:The river has risen not to exceed 6 inches since yesterday, and not more than 2 inches of that 6 since dark to-night. It has not yet risen sufficiently to wash out the timbers that were laid for the men to cross on. Was any bridge built across the river? What was the result of the firing this evening? I will report again in an hour about the river.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.