War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0263 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING, December 29, 1862-3 p.m.

Colonel J. P. GARESCHE,

Chief of Staff:

COLONEL: General Van Cleve is just passing; has nothing of interest to report, having seen no enemy. I can now distinctly hear troops passing to my right, which I now suppose to be General Negley's forces. I have waited for some answer to my dispatches, but as I suppose there is to be none, I shall immediately go on. The troops have not halted.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS LEFT WING,

Five miles from Murfreesborough, December 29, 1862-3.52 p.m.

Colonel J. P. GARESCHE,

Chief of Staff:

COLONEL: An aide of General Wood brings word that on the other side of Stone's River the enemy is in full view; infantry, artillery, and cavalry in regular order of battle are posted. He has halted to gather up his column and await orders. Shall we force our way over to-night? General Negley is now in the road ahead of General Van Cleve, having come in by a country road that comes into the turnpike just 5 miles from Murfreesborough. I am going immediately to the front.

Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. LEFT WING, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS, December 29, 1862-4 p.m.

Colonel GARESCHE,

Chief of Staff:

I am now in front, within three-fourths of a mile of Stone's River. The enemy is plainly in view. Shall I advance farther?

Respectfully,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

December 29, 1862.

Major-General CRITTENDEN:

Dispatch of 4 p.m. received. If you see good chance, open on them with artillery.

GARESCHE,

Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Near Stewart's Creek, December 29, 1862-5.15 p.m.

Major-General CRITTENDEN:

GENERAL: Form your troops in two lines on the most advantageous heights, just out of cannon-shot of the enemy. If too much crowded,