War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0250 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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GALLATIN, December 27, 1862.

General ROSECRANS:

GENERAL: Colonel Harlan has just dispatched that the rebels had taken and destroyed the stockade at Bacon Creek and torn up the railroad 2 miles this side. Colonel Hobson was attacked day before yesterday, but repulsed the enemy, and expected to be attacked again to-day. I shall order Colonel Harlan to go at once to his aid. They are said to be 5,000 strong, with eight pieces of artillery.

SPEED S. FRY,

Brigadier-General.

GALLATIN, TENN., December 27, 1862.

Lieutenant-Colonel GARESCHE:

Morgan has passed on, and, at last accounts, was at Elizabethtown. Now is our time to catch him. If I had 2,000 or 3,000 cavalry at my disposal, I believe we could catch him before he could possibly get out of Kentucky. I would, if permitted, and had the men, start after him to-morrow morning. Is it possible to get the men to go after him? It is thought he was making for the tunnel at Muldraugh's Hill. He should never be allowed to escape out of Kentucky again.

SPEED S. FRY,

Brigadier-General.

BOWLING GREEN, December 27, 1862.

Colonel J. P. GARESCHE:

I deem it necessary that Fort Baker, on the opposite side of the river, should be occupied to save the bridge. Three hundred men, in addition to those present, would effect the object. About 75 men, Twenty-sixth Kentucky Infantry, are at Russellville, which I think available. Cannot entire force at Russellville be sent here? Constant requisitions for convalescents have rendered that force almost worthless, destroying the organization as well as reducing the numbers.

R. S. GRANGER.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Camp near La Vergne, December 27, 1862.

Brig. General R. S. GRANGER,

U. S. Volunteers, Bowling Green:

GENERAL: If Bruce is still at Russellville, his force can, if necessary be brought down to Bowling Green. If gone to Clarksville, it could not be brought back in time to make it available. Fort Baker should be occupied, but you can occupy it with a portion of your own force. General Wright will soon be down in your neighborhood, and will aid you, if needful; but Morgan is in the toils, and being rapidly hemmed in. He will find it so difficult to escape that he will have little leisure to think of offensive operations. The convalescents will not be any further reduced while Morgan remains in Kentucky.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.