War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0233 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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as having left Alexandria Monday morning with 12,000 cavalry and infantry, supported by Kirby Smith, to cross at Gainesborough, en route for Glasgow.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

DECEMBER 24, 1862.

Major-General WRIGHT,

Cincinnati:

General Reynolds telegraphs that, from the fullest information obtainable, Morgan crossed the Cumberland at Carthage on yesterday, on a raid, with about 3,000 cavalry or mounted infantry and three pieces of artillery. Reliable.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, December 24, 1862.

Major-General WRIGHT,

Cincinnati:

I know nothing certain. We have spies out in all that country, but not one saw anything. It has been reported for some time that such a raid was to be made. Think it will be high up. If made, number will be nearer 4,000 than 8,000.

Very truly,

W. S. ROSECRANS.

CINCINNATI, December 24, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

General Boyle telegraphs that Gallatin is threatened, and ask for re-enforcements. I cannot send them. Has this, in your mind, any connection with the Gainesborough movement of the enemy?

WRIGHT,

Major-General.

DECEMBER 24, 1862.

[General WRIGHT:]

Can't make head or tail your dispatch. Morgan is at Glasgow. No danger at Gallatin or Bowling Green.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, December 24, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Nashville, Tenn.:

Please remember that my force in Kentucky is small and scattered, and that if any rebel movement into it in force is made, I must look to you for prompt assistance. I have ordered [Granger?] to move toward Munfordville, via Lebanon, with the most of his forces, as the raid seems directed toward that point. Be wary of telegrams received. The rebels have good operators, and Morgan may telegraph you direct. A merry Christmas.

WRIGHT.