War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0220 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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boxes full. The balance of your ammunition will follow closely, in wagons. Your extra train will be left at Edgefield under guard, together with the cattle and the pack mules.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Nashville, December 24, 1862-10 a.m.

Colonel R. K. BYRD,

Tennessee Infantry, Commanding United States Forces en route for Nashville, Edgefield Junction:

COLONEL: The general commanding desires you at once to resume your march for this city. On your arrival here you will, with your infantry command, report for duty to Brig. General R. B. Mitchell, commanding post, and direct your cavalry force to report to Brig. General D. S. Stanley, chief of cavalry, at this camp on Lebanon pike, just beyond the first creek, outside the town.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

CIRCULAR.] HDQRS. FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Nashville, December 24, 1862-5.30 a.m.

The general commanding directs that you make ample provision for prompt, rapid communication between your division and our headquarters. To this end your own division and brigade commanders should be notified to have their staff officers provide themselves with paper and writing materials, and their orderlies and couriers placed under direction of a staff officer, who will give his whole attention to it. You will also provide means of communication with these headquarters, either by courier, signaling, or telegraph. The general commanding will notify you of the place of his headquarters, and establish a line of couriers, where signaling and telegraph cannot be used. Couriers should be at close distance, and, if practicable, as close as the nature of the ground will admit-half a mile part, and in sight of each other, if necessary. This is of vital importance, and the only way by which we can make a combined movement.

BYRON KIRBY,

Second Lieutenant Sixth Infantry, Aide-de-Camp.

(To Generals Crittenden, McCook, Negley, Rousseau, and Thomas.)

DECEMBER 24, 1862-12 m.

Major-General CRITTENDEN:

Move with your corps to a strong military point in the vicinity of La Vergne, occupying a front of two divisions, one in reserve. The point may be either in front of rear of La Vergne, provided it be a good one. Cover your flanks, if necessary, by natural obstacles, or, if necessary, by retiring them slightly, or by strong guards. The position should command the road to Nolensville, on which you will open communication