War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0201 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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and capture his whole concern. I have a force one-third the size of the force at Gallatin, and cannot concentrate them without abandoning important points. I still hope you will head off the scoundrel, and stop the Hartsville hole.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, December 19, 1862.

Major-General CRITTENDEN:

Send reconnaissance of one division early to-morrow across Stone's River. Stanley will furnish cavalry. Particulars by courier.

By command:

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Nashville, December 19, 1862-9 p.m.

Major-General THOMAS L. CRITTENDEN,

Commanding Left Wing, Camp on Murfreesborough pike:

GENERAL: The general commanding desires you to send out a division to-morrow on reconnaissance; one brigade in the direction of Rural Hill, one toward Silver Springs, and the other to be held in reserve at the crossing of Stone's River. Morgan's force of about 5,000 cavalry, with a few pieces of artillery, has positively reached the Cumberland, and the object of the reconnaissance is to ascertain if Kirby Smith is moving in support, in which case we will probably march immediately upon Murfreesborough,and endeavor at the same time to cut Smith off from the main body of the enemy. General Stanley will furnish the cavalry force to accompany the division from your command. Please arrange with him the hour of starting, which should be an early one.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

GALLATIN, December 19, 1862.

Lieutenant-Colonel GARESCHE:

The surgeon in charge of our wounded men at Hartsville reports that John H. Morgan, with a considerable force, is within a short distance of that place. His camp-fires are seen from Hartsville, and a portion of his men are already across the river. I am very much inclined to think, from all I can learn, that quite a heavy force will be moved down upon this place at an early day. This place is by no means secure against a force of 15,000 or 20,000. I deem it important that a strong force be kept here until the river rises. There are no guns as yet in the fort.

SPEED S. FRY,

Brigadier-General.