War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0197 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. - UNION.

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rumor and belief of Lebanon, Smith arrived at New Middleton yesterday or day before. Mr. Thompson will report to me in the morning. He is going to Nashville. Skillfully handled, more information might, perhaps, be obtained. If this rumor the be true, it indicates a demonstration on our lines between Nashville and this place.

GEO. E. FLYNT,

Major and Chief of Staff.

JACKSON, TENN., December 18, 1862-5 p.m.

General ROSECRANS:

Have just received the following dispatch. My cavalry have been fighting all day:

CORINTH,

General SULLIVAN:

One of my men arrived just now; left Shelbyville Friday, Columbia Saturday; went to Tuscumbia; could not get through, and returned to Waynesborough; left there yesterday at 2 o'clock; Forrest with 2,000 to 2,500 cavalry and five pieces of artillery, left near there Tuesday. Napier, with from 2,000 to 3,000 and four pieces of artillery, crossing at Carrollville Monday to join Forrest. They reported that they were to strike Jackson first and Bethel next, their intention being to stop supplies to our army. No infantry has left Shellbyville west, but there was a movement of all forces taking place north; some said they were to go west, but this fact could not be ascertained. No infantry accompanied Forrest to Columbia. The scout that brings this has never yet failed, and I believe his statement. He saw Forrest's cavalry and artillery, but did not see Napier's command, but saw men from Carrollville who did see it.

G. M. DODGE,

Brigadier-General

JER. C. SULLIVAN,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, December 18, 1862

Brigadier-General SULLIVAN,

Jackson, Tenn.:

Your telegram received. General Rosecrans advises that you mount your infantry and chase Forrest out of the country.

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cincinnati, Ohio, December 18, 1862-12 noon

Major-General HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Have just returned from Lexington, and have arranged an expedition, details of which will be communicated by letter. It starts to-day or to-morrow. Forces in Kentucky are in Big Sandy region. About 2,800 effectives in Central Kentucky, about 13,000 stationed at Richmond and Danville and in advance, and at Lexington, Frankfort, Winchester, and on railroads in that district; in Western Kentucky, about 12,000 effectives, guarding Louisville and Nashville Railroad,and protecting the country from rebel raids. This last force is mainly on the railroad at important points, and to the right and left, as far as Hopkinsville