War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0181 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE,ETC. - UNION.

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as being found in small squads or un-uniformed. A defensive war conducted by a people repelling the invasion of their homes is naturally accompanied with less formality than an offensive one. IN the latter, the soldiers are chiefly from distant parts, and safety requires that they should keep well together. In the former, circumstances admit of the policy which we find so advantageous, and we shall continue to pursue it without being deterred in the least by the ill-grounded charges of improper warfare.

As to your suggestions that our troops should be more particularly distinguished form citizens by a well-defined uniform, I will merely state that we aim to clothe them as uniformly as the exigencies of our situation will admit. Whenever you will afford us the facilities to obtain the requisite material, we shall be most happy to make the desired change. In the mean time we shall use the best to be procured.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF TENNESSEE,

Murfreesborough, Ten., December 15, 1862

Major-General W. S. ROSECRANS

Commanding United States Forces, Nashville, Tenn.:

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your of the 12th instant, in which you disclaim any intention to reflect discourteously upon me in a previous letter. In respect to sending persons through my lines, I shall interpose no obstacle to the passage of mere citizens, especially ladies, so long as they do not act as spies. If those sent give information,it is for you to check, not me. I assure you, however, I have no need for them on that score. The fact that you have penetrated a country so unanimously hostile to you and your Government should sufficiently account for the facility with which I can obtain information, without the necessity of devising special means to procure it.

As regards the prisoners, I am not aware of having violated the cartel in proposing their reception at your lines. My proposition was as open for your adoption or rejection as if they had been retained here in the interval. In not sending them to Vicksburg their own comfort was consulted, as thereby they were saved a long and tedious march at this inclement season. In depriving them of their overcoats and blankets, I am sorry to say I but followed a very bad example constantly practiced by your own troops, as testified by your experience, and, more especially,by your won representatives, who received them from my inspector-general. When complaint was made to him, he remarked, " I regret the practice and condemn it, but as we have inaugurated it we have no right to complain." Our prisoners return from their Northern captivity in a most destitute condition and deprived of everything but barely enough to cover nakedness. The exceptions are only where sympathizing friends can by stealth give them some few articles of clothing. Their money is invariably taken from them. We have never yet descended so far as that, and regret the necessity which has led to the act of which you have complained.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

General, Commanding.