War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0133 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.,

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a trifling stand of an hour and a quarter, surrendered to five regiments. Better order them to concentrate, to keep a sharp lookout, and keep me constantly advised of Forrest's movements.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding Department.

LOUISVILLE, KY., December 7, 1862

Major-General WRIGHT, Cincinnati, Ohio:

General Rosecrans telegraphs that Forrest left Columbia for a raid into Kentucky, via Clarksville,or that direction; has battery of six pieces. Granger and Bruce advised or ordered to co-operate and whip him, and take his guns. We need artillery. Can you not get General Rosecrans to occupy Clarksville and cover that part of our border?

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, December 7, 1862.

Brigadier-General BOYLE, Louisville, Ky.:

I have asked General Rosecrans to cover Clarksville, unless Forrest's force is large. Your arrangement will be ample, I think, though I do not know exactly Bruce's force, as no return of it has ever been made. What of the rebel cavalry between Glasgow and Scottsville, reported by Granger?

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, December 7, 1862-10.20 p.m.

Brigadier-General BOYLE, Louisville, Ky.:

General Rosecrans says that Forrest has 5,000 men, and thinks him bound into Kentucky. Instruct Bruce to keep a sharp lookout; not to attempt fighting a largely superior force; but to concentrate by joining Granger. We must not be beaten in detail. Bruce must keep his force well in hand for fighting or falling back. Be careful that Forrest don't get between him and Granger, and keep General Rosecrans advised of Forrest's movements. Will send General Gilbert back to-morrow.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, December 7, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, Nashville, Tenn.:

Canvas boats are not so reliable as wooden ones. Unless great care is used, canvas necessarily mildews and then soon rots. If used by soldiers for shelter, it would soon become damaged for boats. It is not entirely water-proof, even after it lies in the water some time. It is doubtful whether canvas boats are as reliable in ordinarily rapid streams as wooden ones, especially if the bridge is required to serve a long time, as on a line of communication. Canvas is more easily punctured and worn by floating bodies, and requires to be taken out of the bridge to