War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0119 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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take post. Please provide for the country thus uncovered. Boyle reports that force of Munfordville is too small, and without artillery, and that Hall dismantled works there.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, December 4, 1862

Colonel A. S. HALL, Glasgow:

Telegram received. General commanding directs you to move your

force down to Carthage, and there take post. You will draw supplies from Gallatin. Report your arrival to General Thomas, and keep open your communication with him.

Rebel soldiers honestly desiring to return home and keep quiet will be permitted to do so on taking non-combatant parole, and entering into sufficient bonds to keep same.

By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

CINCINNATI, December 4, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

Colonel Hall had no cavalry belonging to his brigade, nor had he authority to take all the infantry from Munfordville, unless he got it from you. The understanding was that I should exchange new regiments for old ones. You sent three to Munfordville, and Colonel Hall, instead of taking away three, took the whole command-infantry, cavalry and artillery. The cavalry, it seems, was ordered back, and unless one of the infantry regiments and the battery are also returned, the garrison will be too weak to make your communications fully secure at that point. I do not see where troops are to come from my command for this purpose.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, December 4, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Nashville, Tenn.:

Intelligence received from ----, that Humphrey Marshall has near 3,000 troops at Abingdon, Kingsport, and Whitesburg, and that the rebels are getting up 3,000 mules for the purpose of returning to Kentucky ; and that Morgan, from Middle Tennessee, intends to move in at same time with 7,000 cavalry; that the rebels think and say we have only a small force, in Kentucky, and that they will meet little or no opposition. I don't believe it fully.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.