War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0107 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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dressed as citizens. Make such pay dearly. Take no slaves with you except such as are lawfully allowed as teamsters and servants, and have such put on quartermaster's rolls and reported. Keep up your supplies.

By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

C. R. THOMPSON,

Captain and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, Tenn., November 29, 1862.

Brigadier General J. T. BOYLE, Louisville:

Dispatch received from Bradfordsville, via Lebanon, from J. D. Hale, states that Captain Finley, with 30 men, had arrived there from Hamilton County, near Chattanooga. The information they give is of so great importance that I telegraphed to ask who Captain Finley and J. D. Hale are. Can you tell me?

By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

C. R. THOMPSON.

Captain and Aide-de-Camp

LOUISVILLE, November 29, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

J. D. Hale is a reliable scout, well known to Major-General Thomas, and recently in my employ. I do not know Captain Finley, but suppose he is captain of new recruits from Tennessee, for the Seventh or Eighth Tennessee Regiment. I will inquire at Lebanon in regard to Finley. Your order in regard to rebel recruits, &c., shall be attended to.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, November 29, 1862.

Major General HORATIO G. WRIGHT,

Lexington, Ky.,:

General Rosecrans telegraphs that the hill on Munfordville side should be fortified,and not with a two-penny work. He also thus explains the Finley report.

The report alluded to is as follows:

BRADFORDSVILLE, KY., via LEBANON, November 28.

General ROSECRANS:

Captain Finley, with 30 men, arrived at this point last night. They left Hamilton County, near Chattanooga, last week, and report the rebels in great commotion. Troops arrive and go south, some to Mississippi and some said to be going to Mobile. Not preparing to hold Chattanooga. All cars were pressed into the service for nine days, and were used in taking troops south. There are a great many boats loaded with troops going down the Tennessee River. They are also busily engaged taking the corn and hogs south, and conveying all out of Sequatchie Valley. Georgia troops all going home.

J. D. HALE.

McLEAN,

Major