War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0106 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA.,AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXII.

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NASHVILLE, November 29, 1862.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS:

Colonel Hambright reports from Mitchellsville that his force is so much reduced by details for train guards that any further [reduction] would leave it defenseless. Says his scouts, of yesterday, report both cavalry and infantry of enemy east toward Scottsville, in small parties of 15 to 20.

By order:

C. GODDARD,

Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, November 29, 1862.

Colonel H. A. HAMBRIGHT, Mitchellsville:

Orders will be sent for troops at Munfordville to furnish train guards. I case of emergency, will have to call on you to do so. Are no the supposed enemy at Scottsville our own troops? Send out strong reconnaissance in that direction. Guerrillas are being formed to rob the mails. Orders your parties to kill all caught at it, but not to burn houses unless on undoubted proof.

By order of Major-General Rosecrans:

J. P. GARESCHE

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, November 29, 1862.

Colonel HALL, Munfordville:

Repair with you command to Glasgow. Scour all the country round for the enemy;draw your supplies from Cave City, and keep well open your communications in rear.

By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, November 29, 1862.

Colonel HALL, Munfordville:

In addition to your marching order, the general directs you to telegraph the number of wagons, strength of each regiment, and to be very careful to notify the assistant adjutant-general of the receipt and execution of all orders. Take great pains, by scouts, to learn all you can of what is going on east of you; march with proper rear guard, advance, and flankers, thus to accustom your troops to proper marching. Never involve your artillery or trains in a defile until you have possession of it; it avoids both fatigue and danger. Your advance guard and scouts should be instructed to question sharply all hangers-on, stragglers, and countrymen, and take in custody all who cannot give a proper account of themselves. If you have good reason to believe than to be guerrillas or spies, dispose of them. Morgan has sent a gang up the country,