War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0102 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N.ALA.,AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXII.

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men, some of the very worst traitors in that State. It was mainly against the influences of these Kentucky "Union men" that I wished to caution you.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, November 27, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS,

Nashville, Tenn.:

The General-in-Chief authorizes you to order from Cincinnati such a pontoon train as you require. Canvas boats are not to be depended upon and iron without special workmen, are not easily repaired. I would, therefore, recommend wooden bateaux for such a length of bridge as you require. One of General Wright's engineer officers can superintend the construction. A large wooden pontoon train was taken by General Buell from Corinth, and used by him in crossing the Tennessee. What has become of it?

G. W. CULLUM

Brigadier-General, Chief of Staff.

WAR DEPARTMENT

Washington, November 27, 1862

Major-General ROSECRANS, Nashville, Tenn.:

I have approved your requisition on the Engineer Department for more carts, drays, &c., but I must warm you against this piling up of impediments. Take a lesson from the enemy. Move light, and supply yourself as much as possible with provisions, animals, forage, transportation,&c., in the country you pass through. If you remain long at Nashville you will disappoint the wishes of the Government.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

NASHVILLE, TENN.

November 27, 1862-4.40 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK, General-in-Chief:

The carts are for engineer work about Nashville. The delay is for the opening of railroads and getting down ammunition and necessaries. Our advance will be wholly unlike the enemy's. Our entire force of cavalry not half what is necessary for the defense of a permanent work. Every forage and provision train has to be guarded against rebel cavalry, which is numerous.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

RUSSELLVILLE, November 27, 1862.

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff:

I have reliable scout from Cumberland River. He reports 3,000 guerrillas, with six pieces of artillery, at Charlotte, Tenn. Their object is to