War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0089 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

Nashville, November 22, 1862.

Major-General THOMAS,

Commanding, Center:

GENERAL: The commanding general desires the following movement of troops to be made, under your direction, immediately: General Dumont's command from Scottsville to Gallatin; General Rousseau, with two brigades of his division, to this city, to encamp on the ground recently occupied by Sheridan's division, his remaining brigade to be disposed of in the best manner both to protect the depot at Mitchellsville and carry on the work of loading and unloading at that point, and to protect the road from there to Edgefield Junction; and finally, one brigade of Fry's division to Edgefield Junction, if it can be moved without detriment to the work going on at the tunnel and at Gallatin.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

(Copy to Major-General Crittenden.)

LOUISVILLE, November 22, 1862.

General ROSECRANS:

Major----, of the Paymaster's Department, just arrived, reports Morgan, with 4,000 men, near Hartsville and west of that place, sending out small squads and picking up large numbers of stragglers. Our men put themselves in the way of being taken. Will you issue order having one-half of the head of every rascal paroled on straggling shaved? It will do good. May not Kirby Smith have circulated information of his returning to Kentucky, feeling sure that you would disbelieve it? Reports are made of rebel force in Cumberland Gap road.

J. T. BOYLE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, November 22, 1862.

Major-General GORDON GRANGER,

Lexington, Ky.:

Keep me advised of any intelligence you may get about the enemy's movements. If there is any truth in the report sent you yesterday, you should concentrate your force so as to be able to act with superior numbers. I can hardly believe the enemy to be advancing in any very large force; but, if so, he must make a rapid march to the blue-grass country in order to get subsistence. Your dispositions of force will depend on the character of the inroad, and this you should ascertain at once. If in force, he will keep his troops together, and you should concentrate to meet him. If it be only a raid in weak force to destroy bridges and carry off property, then your troops must be disposed at important points, in strength enough at each to resist and act offensively against him. Let me hear from you.

Yours,

WRIGHT.