War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0076 KY.,MID.AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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lished before the river rises, to close the gaps against raids of every sort. Your Kanawha command needs little; the rods are a guarantee against all.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS,

Cincinnati, November 20, 1862.

Major General ROSECRANS:

I have ordered General Boyle to send three of the four regiments now along the line of railroad to Bowling Green, with a battery, which is now at Louisville. This with the convalescents, which I hope you will send there speedily, with their arms, will suffice for that garrison, and the other forces along the road will afford full protection, at any rate till your command moves. Boyle is a good man for Louisville, and I should regret losing him; and yet I should be pleased to accommodate General Rousseau. If Nashville would suit his case as well, I should prefer not removing Boyle, who has shown much energy. Cox says he cannot spare Crook, and General Halleck wants the division farther east as soon as it can be spared. The orders from Washington are such that neither of us can expect more troops from this department; they go elsewhere.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, November 20, 1862.

Brigadier-General BOYLE,

Commanding, &c., Louisville, Ky.:

General Rosecrans wishes to withdraw Granger's brigade and Stokes' battery from Bowling Green. Send there three of the four regiments new on the line of the railroad, and Andrews' battery. The railroad

must be protected by the remaining regiment and such detachments as may be required from Munfordville. Report your opinion as to the adequacy of this protection to the line. Bowling Green will be strengthened by a convalescent camp from General Rosecrans' army.

H. G. WRIGHT,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,

Cincinnati, Ohio, November 20, 1862.

Honorable THOMAS EWING, Lancaster, Ohio:

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 16th instant, calling attention to the danger of bands of robbers and horse thieves, under the name of guerrillas, forming on the opposite shore of the Ohio, and after the river is frozen, crossing over and committing depredations in this State. As the troops in Kentucky are dispersed, there would seem to be little danger of such raids in any force. That it may be attempted by small bands of thieves is very possible, and to guard fully against such incursions will be hardly within the power of the military. The citizens living upon the border must aid in their own protection. All the troops in the department, if scattered