War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0065 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC.-UNION.

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NASHVILLE, TENN., November 18, 1862-4 p.m.

Major-General HALLECK:

I shall wish to fortify some depots on the Cumberland River, in the vicinity of Carthage, of Burkesville, and Norman's Landing, near Monticello. The Tennessee Mountaineers, with a small garrison to hold the depot and fall back on, will keep these avenues into Kentucky closed, and give peace to the country. Can you not send me a few more engineer officers? They Army of the Potomac cannot possibly be as much in want of engineers as I am. I shall also need some pontoneers. Cannot some, at least the nucleus of such a force, be spared me from the engineer's office?

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

GALLATIN, November 18, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

Colonel Kise reports from Hartsville that, from information received from citizens, the enemy will attack him in the morning. Do not believe there is anything in it, but have ordered the balance of the Second Brigade to his support, and, if Kise is not attacked, to post two regiments at Castalian Springs, about half way from this to Hartsville, were two roads from Lebanon come into the road from here to Hartsville. I have directed Colonel Harlan also to call upon the people near Castalian Springs to contribute forage, and have it hauled here, to be sent to Nashville. They are good secessionists, and rich. Am I right?

GEO. H. THOMAS.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, November 18, 1862.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Comdg. Center, Army of the Cumberland, Gallatin, Tenn.;

Your dispatch, announcing threatened attack on Hartsville, is just received. Colonel Kennett was to-day ordered to leave a regiment of cavalry at that point, and, with the rest of his force, was ordered into this city, being directed to cross the Cumberland, and, if he could do it without risk, to come around by Lebanon. Suspend this movement if you deem proper. The general wishes to know by what amount of force Colonel Kennett thinks himself threatened.

By order of Major-General Rosecrans:

J. P. GARESCHE,

Assistant Adjutant-General and Chief of Staff.

GALLATIN, November 18, 1862.

Major-General ROSECRANS:

My dispatch said Colonel Kise reported threatened attack. Colonel Kennett left Hartsville yesterday, and reported to General Crittenden. I don't think there is any necessity of suspending the order for Colonel Kennett to go to Nashville. Colonel Kise reports that he was threatened by 2,000; whether infantry or cavalry he did not say. I think it probable that some cavalry are approaching Hartsville merely to observe

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

5 R R - VOL XX, PT II