War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0058 KY.,MID.AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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paing this winter can hardly be overstated; at the mere cost of the arms and mounting, it will add to our force one to two regiments for every regiment we mount. Is it possible for you to carry out this great measure by furnishing 4,000 revolving rifles? Prompt action in this matter is called for.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

NASHVILLE, TENN.,

November 16, 1862-9.45 p.m.

Major General H. W HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

It seems pretty certain that four divisions of Bragg's army have come to Middle Tennessee. They designed to take Nashville. They began winter quarters at Tullahoma, and are now at that place and McMinnville, with Breckinridge at Murfreesborough. The bridge at Bridgeport, from the other side to the island, is done. Steamboat ferry this side. Are moving off their sick and all the produce their road can carry toward Chattanooga. I wait the opening of the railroad, which will be on Thursday next, before moving. We move from, and they toward, supplies. Rain threatens. General, we must have arms for our cavalry. Without arms we lose their services, and those of all the infantry absorbed in guarding trains and roads. Nothing but insurmountable obstacles can justify the present condition of things. Can you remedy it?

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

NASHVILLE, TENN.,

November 16, 1862-10 p.m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I want to mount some infantry regiments, arm them with revolving rifles, and make sharpshooters of them. I cannot elaborate all the consequences that will flow from this, but they will be immense. Can you give me the arms in exchange for some I have?

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. LEFT WING, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

November 16, 1862-9 a.m.

Major-General THOMAS,

Commanding the Center:

GENERAL: Under instructions from General Rosecrans, I yesterday sent a brigade to Rural Hill, who report themselves in position, having arrived without loss or interruption. I also sent General Wood with his division to Lebanon; he found no enemy there but about 300 cavalry. After destroying the mill and some wheat and flour, he returned to camp last evening. Colonel Kennett has been ordered to join me here. Most respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. L. CRITTENDEN,

Major-General, Commanding.