War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0056 KY.,MID.AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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here who have been arrested, some for recruiting for the rebel army, and others as recruits, and still others as being implicated in burning railroad bridges and driving stock to the rebel army. What disposition will be made of them? I find here also a large quantity of corn in the field. Would it not be well to have it gathered and sent to Nashville as soon as the railroad is opened? I saw Mr. Anderson yesterday. The bridges and trestles between the tunnel and Gallatin will be finished to-day, and his workmen will commence on those south of Gallatin, assisted by a regiment of infantry on Monday. He also thinks the south tunnel will be repaired by Wednesday.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

GALLATIN, November 15, 1862-9.40 a.m.

Lieut. Colonel ARTHUR C. DUCAT,

Acting Chief of Staff:

Dispatch November 14, 10 p.m., received. Two regiments and battery of artillery had already been ordered to Hartsville, with instructions to remain there. If the force represented are at Lebanon, I think two brigades from Crittenden's corps could surprise and capture the whole. Am I to understand that General Dumont is to mount his whole brigade at Tompkinsville, or only to procure pack animals?

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General, U. S. Volunteers.

GALLATIN, November 15, 1862-6 p.m.

General ROSECRANS:

Have just heard from Crittenden. He reports that a scout sent by him went some 7 miles beyond Lebanon, on the Murfreesborough road,and brings back information that Morgan's headquarters are 10 miles this side of Murfreesborough; that he keeps no force at Lebanon, for fear of being cut off by our troops, either from Silver Springs or Hartsville; that Breckinridge has at Murfreesborough not to exceed 8,000 men; that he receives re-enforcements of from 300 to 500 men daily, sent up by two small engines; that Breckinridge is barely fortifying, but has no intention of fighting there. The stand is to be made at McMinnville or Chattanooga. They are moving supplies and heavy guns as fast as possible; that all their bacon, flour, sugar, and coffee is still at Murfreesborough, and that they cannot move those supplies for some days to come. They will, therefore, make strong demonstrations to check our advance. General Crittenden believes this information is perfectly reliable. When will Stanley arrive? It is a great pity he is not now in command of the cavalry. We could take Murfreesborough, and march at once on McMinnville. Should the enemy make a stand at McMinnville, we can beat him badly, and, when beaten, he will be completely routed, as he cannot retreat through the mountains. I know the locality, and have an excellent map of it besides, made from actual observation.

GEO. H. THOMAS,

Major-General.