War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0044 KY.,MID.AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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GENERAL ORDERS,

HDQRS. FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

No. 13.

Nashville, Tenn., November 13, 1862.

I. Lieut. Col. Julius P. Garesche, assistant adjutant-general, having reported for duty, is announced as chief of staff of the general commanding. All official communications will be addressed to him.

II. Capt. James St. C. Morton, Corps of Engineers U. S. Army, is announced as chief engineer of this corps d'armee, and will direct all engineering operations in this department. Commanders of the troops will furnish fatigue parties upon his requisition.

III. Capt. John G. Chandler, assistant quartermaster, is relieved from duty as acting chief quartermaster of the department, and will report at these headquarters for further orders.

IV. Capt. John W. Taylor, assistant quartermaster, is announced as chief quartermaster of the department, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly.

By command of Major-General Rosecrans:

ARTHUR C. DUCAT,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Acting Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Nashville, November 13, 1862.

Major General HORATIO G. WRIGHT, Cincinnati:

Please let me know what orders you have given to secure railroad.

What news from Gilbert? I want to have all his reports about the front he is on; it is excellent for news. Don't fail to have a good courier line with Lebanon from his rear.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General.

HDQRS. LEFT WING, FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

November 14, 1862-10 a.m.

Lieut. Colonel ARTHUR C. DUCAT, Chief of Staff:

COLONEL: I send down this morning, under the escort of the Twenty-sixth Kentucky Regiment, numbering about 200 men, some prisoners.

I left with General Rosecrans a memorandum for this regiment, and I now send them down because I think it essential to keep some infantry moving on this road; otherwise communication will be constantly interrupted. I sent a note from Stone's River yesterday, and, not having heard from it since, cannot tell whether you or not. I will be compelled to move from this point shortly, as water and forage will fail me. I do not like my position, and all my commanders are of my mind. I think I ought to be on the other side of Stone's River, but a slight rise in the Cumberland might cut me off from supplies, and if Stone's River was not fordable, at the same time I should be cut off from Nashville. If my command was on the west side of Stone's River, I could haul supplies by the way of Nashville as easily as I can now haul them. I call the attention of the general commanding to a fact I did not thoroughly understand when I saw him. Seven miles west of my position, and some 5 or 6 miles east of Stone's River, a good turnpike runs into the road from here to Nashville, and also runs into the