War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0036 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA. Chapter XXXII.

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were at Knoxville, with troops under orders to march, supposed to Tullahoma. Three Florida and two North Carolina regiments, with thirteen guns, at the gap. The movement spoken of in my dispatch

from Murfreesborough, retiring, may doubtless, be in accordance with a defensive arrangement near Tullahoma. The question of their subsistence is one on which I have not sufficient data to judge, but, as stated in my former dispatch, the scarcity is said to be considerable, and, if so, they ought to fight for Middle Tennessee. I do not think it yet certain whether they will do so or not. If they will, it will be much to our advantage, as in that case we shall be able to crush them by a decisive battle. But we must beware of scattering our forces, or removing too many from Kentucky. We should provide for eventualities, and endeavor to have the superiority on the most necessary point. Our railroad and telegraph lines must be more carefully watched than usual, and I think we shall be able to secure this by the additional cavalry you have sent me, if we can only get them properly armed. They are not at all so now. Please do all you can for us.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

NASHVILLE, November 11, 1862.

Major-General CRITTENDEN,

Commanding Left Wing:

GENERAL: The general commanding directs me to state that your dispatch of to-day has been received. A dispatch is also received from General Smith, who is at Gallatin with two brigades, the other pushing up to overtake him. It is desirable that you open communication with him as soon as possible, by courier line. We can probably get through with cars to Fountain Head, or perhaps, nearer, so he can draw rations from those points. In any case, General Smith will reach you to-morrow, and then you will know the true state of affairs. We expected that when information was sent you that he had orders to march that you would have communicated with his advance. The telegraph to Louisville has been open it to-morrow. The reports from you of operations at Lebanon and Hartsville are satisfactory. It is a pity we could not have been up sooner. Guard your front carefully, and be very watchful. Keep up a good system of vedette and grand guards, and stop communications of citizens with the city, unless they have important information to give, when you will admit them under guard. General Rosecrans will be pleased to see you, as proposed, to-morrow. There is much information and news he can give you that it is much better not to send by courier.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ARTHUR C. DUCAT,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Acting Chief of Staff.

NASHVILLE, TENN., November 11, 1862.

Major General GEORGE H. THOMAS,

Commanding Center:

GENERAL:

I dispatched you this a.m. to send one of Rousseau's brigades to relieve Carlin's at Edgefield. You may now direct him to place