War of the Rebellion: Serial 030 Page 0021 Chapter XXXII. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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You have, doubtless, reports from Colonel Zahm that Morgan was at Gallatin, with pickets at Tunnel Hill. General Crittenden moving on Gallatin from Scottsville. I want every force sent to protect the tunnel whilst being cleared out and put in repair. I also want telegraph line to follow you down as far as possible, leaving an office at Mitchellsville. I also want report of all roads, right and left, running out from the railroads running south, stating condition of those roads for hauling purposes, as well as for infantry and cavalry. I want to have daily a note from you reporting where you are, what has happened and you know.

W. S. ROSECRANS,

Major-General, Commanding.

To be forwarded from telegraph office without delay.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION,

Camp near Mitchellsville, November 7, 1862.

General ROSECRANS:

GENERAL: My command reached this point this evening. I will push forward a portion of it to-morrow morning as early as possible. I have heard nothing from Colonel Zahm since I left Bowling Green. I will get a correct account of the various roads leading south from the railroad. I have not had time as yet to do so. I learned from citizens at Franklin this morning that Morgan was at Edgefield, and so dispatched from Franklin.

Yours,

SPEED S. FRY,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS FOURTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Bowling Green, November 7, 1862 - 10 p.m.

Colonel JOHN KENNETT,

Commanding Cavalry (via Mitchellsville and courier lines):

COLONEL: The general commanding directs that you make a strong occupation of Hartsville, and also send cavalry enough in front of General Crittenden in his advance across the river toward Lebanon, and on his front, opening communication with Nashville. At this distance you must be the best judge of the position and the intentions of the rebel cavalry. The general commanding expects that you will exercise your own judgment in many respects, governed by the several movements ordered.

You will, on receipt of this, communicate rapidly with General Crittenden, and co-operate with him. The mission of the rebel cavalry was, from all we can learn, to destroy and prevent us from repairing the railroad to Nashville; they have failed in this. General Crittenden will tell you the news. See him as possible.

The general wishes me to state that he does not consider your dispatches satisfactory, and would like them oftener; that communication with his headquarters must at all times be kept up, wherever they are.

I have have the honor to be, colonel,

ARTHUR C. DUCAT,

Lieutenant-Colonel and Acting Chief of Staff

P. S. - Work secretly and quietly. Do not let the enemy know of your movements.