War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0890 KY.,MID. AND E.TENN.,N.ALA.,AND SW.VA. Chapter XXXII.

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No. 268. Report of Col. John M. Hughs, Twenty-fifth Tennessee Infantry.

ESTILL SPRINGS, TENN., January 7, 1863.

[I have the honor to submit the following] report of the part [taken in] the battle of Murfreesborough, Tenn., [by the] Twenty-fifth Tennessee Regiment:

The regiment moved by daylight in the morning with the brigade to attack the enemy. The enemy's skirmishers having commenced firing on us, Captain [M.] Lowrey's company was deployed and sent forward in advance. After a few rounds had been fired, I was struck to continue to command, so I left the field.

So far as I witnessed the conduct of the officers and men, it was highly commendable. The efforts of Captain [G. H.] Hash and Lieut. D. S. Walker were particularly distinguished.

Respectfully submitted.

JOHN M. HUGHS,

Colonel, Commanding Twenty-fifth Tennessee.

No. 269. Report of Lieutenant Col. Samuel Davis, Twenty-fifth Tennessee Infantry.

ESTILL SPRINGS, TENN., January 7, 1863.

[I have the honor to submit the following] report of the part taken by the Twenty-fifth Tennessee Regiment in the battle of Murfreesborough:

The regiment moved early in the morning with the brigade, Captain Lowrey's company in front as skirmishers. The brigade made a right-wheel and rested in a lane, with its center [this regiment] fronting another narrow lane. It was up this last lane that the enemy was first discovered. As the skirmishers moved across the lane, the brigade having moved a little by the left flank, the enemy's skirmishers fired upon them. No firing was done by the skirmishers or the regiment until the brigade was in full view of the enemy, on top of the rise. The regiment then commenced firing, and I never saw in any battle a more regular and constant fire, which was kept up until the enemy gave back. Although a great many of our men were killed and wounded at this place, the line was not confused, and the men continued to fire without noticing those killed or wounded. Colonel Hughs was wounded when the line first commenced to fire, and was conveyed away from the field by his friend, J. M. Richardson, a citizen.

When the enemy commenced to retreat, the regiment moved forward, but so many had been left out that it was impossible to keep a line any