War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0790 KY., MID. AND E. TENN., N. ALA., AND SW. VA.

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[CHAP. XXXII.

things. The two brigades your ordered your ordered to me might be held at the ford of the river, subject to further developments. If necessary, I could get them into position from that point before the enemy could reach me.

Very respectfully,

JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE,

Major-General.

[Inclosure Numbers 4.]

HEADQUARTERS BRECKINRIDGE'S DIVISION,

In the Field, December 31, 1862-7 p.m.

General BRAXTON BRAGG,

Commanding Army of Tennessee:

GENERAL: When I crossed the river this evening with two brigades, I left General Hanson's brigade holding the hill already designated on the commanding position in front of my division. I have the honor now to report that Hanson's brigade is still in the same position, with three batteries, isolated from the balance of the army.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN C. BRECKINRIDGE.

[Inclosure Numbers 5.]

HEADQUARTERS IN THE FIELD,

[January 2, 1863-1 p.m.

Brigadier-General PEGRAM:

GENERAL: The general is about moving to take by force a position between Hower's house and the right of our line, on the [this] side of the river. General Wharton will be there. You will arrange and dispose your command in the vicinity of Hower's, so as to co-operate with this movement.

Respectfully,

GEORGE WM. BRENT,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

Received.

JOHN PEGRAM,

Brigadier-General.

[Addenda.]

HEADQUARTERS BRECKINRIDGE'S DIVISION,

Tullahoma, Tenn., March 31, 1863.

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General, Richmond, Va.:

SIR: Two days ago I read General Braxton Bragg's official report of the battles of Stone's River, before Murfreesborough, and, after a proper time for reflection, I think it my duty to send you this communication.

I cannot conceal from myself the fact that so much of the report as refers to my conduct and that of my command (except some general compliments to the courage of a portion of my troops on Wednesday, 31st of December) is in tone and spirit a thorough disparagement of both. This tone runs through all its parts, and lies like a broad foundation underneath the whole. At the same time the narrative of events is made to sustain the general spirit.

While the report of the commanding general fails, as I think, to do justice to the behavior of my division on Friday, the 2nd of January, yet its strictures are chiefly leveled at my own conduct as an officer during