War of the Rebellion: Serial 029 Page 0749 Chapter XXXII. THE STONE'S RIVER CAMPAIGN.

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of both my officers and men during the battle. Among those conspicuous for bravery on the field, Major John W. Dawson merits a position, as also Adjt. W. H. Stovall, who took command of Company G after Captain B. B. Hutcheson was carried off the field wounded, and commanded the company with ability. In fact, it is impossible to discriminate where all nobly performed their part.

The regiment went into action 245 aggregate, and our loss was:

Killed.................................................... 14

Wounded................................................... 83

Missing................................................... 3

--- Total.....................................................100

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

M. MAGEVNEY, JR.,

Lieutenant Colonel Comdg. One hundred and fifty-fourth Senior Tenn.

Lieutenant F. B. RODGERS, Aide-de-Camp.

Numbers 216. Report of Colonel William H. Young, Ninth Texas Infantry.

JANUARY 6, 1863.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of my regiment while separated from the brigade in the action of December 31, 1862:

The regiment advanced in its proper position with the brigade until the brigade entered the corn-field in front of the original line of battle occupied by it. Here the regiment by its position, was immediately on the left of the field when the brigade became engaged. There being no enemy in my front, I moved forward, by order of Captain Cluskey, to the top of the next hill, when the enemy appeared off to my right-oblique about 200 yards. I ordered the regiment to fire, upon which they poured two volleys into the enemy; but perceiving that the brigade had obliqued to the right and knowing that my fire would be more effective by a nearer approach to the enemy, I moved by the right flank until my right was near the Twenty-ninth Tennessee; I then moved by the left flank and took position behind a tall fence and opened fire on the enemy, who was posted about 100 yards immediately in my front, behind a ledge of rocks and a fence. Here General Wood's brigade, which was on my left when Captain Cluskey ordered me forward, came up on my left again and opened fire; but seeing that our combined attack had but little effect toward dislodging the enemy, I ordered my regiment to cross the fence for the purpose of charging the enemy's position, which they did, but, mistaking my intention, advanced 50 paces and again halted and opened fire. Here, while endeavoring to get them to hear my command "forward," my horse was shot, as well as that of the lieutenant-colonel, and for five minutes the regiment received a most murderous fire, which killed and wounded more than 100 of my men, including nearly all of the commissioned officers. Seeing that we were suffering from a cross-fire, I resolved to charge and rout the enemy from his position. Passing down the line, I notified each company of my intention, and then, taking the colors, I ordered the regiment to move forward with a shout, both of which they did a la Texas. It was at this juncture that Captain Cluskey,